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escape

1. a valve that releases air, steam, etc., above a certain pressure; relief valve or safety valve
2. Botany a plant that was originally cultivated but is now growing wild
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Escape

 

in Soviet criminal law, the crime of evading the serving of a sentence or restraining measures in the form of imprisonment under guard.

According to the Criminal Code of the RSFSR, escape from a place of confinement or from under guard committed by a person serving a sentence or held in preliminary confinement is punishable by deprivation of freedom for a period of up to three years. Escape combined with the use of force against the guard is punishable by a sentence of up to five years. Escape from a place of exile or from an alcoholic reeducation center or escape en route to exile or the center is punishable by deprivation of freedom for a period of up to one year.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

What does it mean when you dream about an escape?

The act of escaping in a dream sometimes indicates the need to face an issue or a condition that one is evading. Alternatively, one may need to “escape” something that is about to collapse, such as a burning building.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

escape

[i′skāp]
(computer science)
To exit from a program, routine, or mode.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

escape

The curved part of the shaft of a column where it springs out of the base; the apophyge, 1.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Escape

Abiathar
only son of Ahimelech to avoid Saul’s slaughter. [O.T.: I Samuel 22:20]
Ariadne
Minos’s daughter; gave Theseus thread by which to escape labyrinth. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 31]
Cerambus
transformed into beetle in order to fly above Zeus’s deluge. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 55]
Christian
flees the City of Destruction. [Br. Lit.: Pilgrim’s Progress]
Daedalus
escaped from Crete by flying on wings made of wax and feathers. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 244]
Dantès, Edmond
after fifteen years in the Chateau d’If he escapes by being thrown into the sea as another prisoner’s corpse. [Fr. Lit.: Dumas The Count of Monte Cristo]
Deucalion
on Prometheus’ advice, survived flood in ark. [Gk. Myth.: Gaster, 84–85]
Dunkirk
340,000 British troops evacuated against long odds (1941). [Eur. Hist.: Van Doren, 475]
Exodus
Jewish captives escape Pharaoh’s bondage. [O.T.: Exodus]
Fugitive, The
(Dr. Richard Kimble) tale of wrongfully-accused man fleeing imprisonment. [TV: Terrace, I, 290–291]
Hansel and Gretel
woodcutter’s children barely escape witch. [Ger. Fairy Tale: Grimm, 56]
Hegira (Hijrah)
Muhammad’s flight from Mecca to Medina (622). [Islamic Hist.: EB, V: 39–40]
Houdini, Harry
(1874–1926) shackled magician could extricate himself from any entrapment. [Am. Hist.: Wallechinsky, 196]
Ishmael
the only one to escape when the Pequod is wrecked by the white whale. [Am. Lit.: Melville, Moby Dick]
Jim
Miss Watson’s runaway slave; Huck’s traveling companion. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]
Jonah
delivered from fish’s belly after three days. [O.T.: Jonah 1, 2]
Noah
with family and animals, escapes the Deluge. [O.T.: Genesis 8:15–19]
Papillon
one of the few to escape from Devil’s Island. [Fr. Hist.: Papillon]
parting of the Red Sea
God divides the waters for Israelites’ flight. [O.T.: Exodus 14:21–29]
Phyxios
epithet of Zeus as god of escape. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 94]
Robin, John, and Harold Hensman
run away from “petticoat government” to live in forest. [Children’s Lit.: Brendon Chase, Fisher, 306]
Strange Cargo
prisoners escape by boat from Devil’s Island, accompanied by a mysterious stranger. [Am. Cinema: Strange Cargo]
Theseus
escapes labyrinth with aid from Ariadne. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 31]
Tyler, Toby
runs away from cruel Uncle Daniel to join circus. [Children’s Lit.: Toby Tyler]
Ziusudra
Sumerian Noah. [Sumerian Legend: Benét, 1116]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ESCAPE

(language)
An early system on the IBM 650.

[Listed in CACM 2(5):16 (May 1959)].

escape

(character)
(ESC) ASCII character 27.

When sent by the user, escape is often used to abort execution or data entry. When sent by the computer it often starts an escape sequence.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)
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SWORD" Escapism becomes a part of the reality you portray because mixing fantasy with reality is integral to the art of storytelling.
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A contemplation which is not escapism but sees God in everything, God in the midst, God in the mess, God in the mystery of transformation.
"The result is a mishmash of cynicism, despair, and escapism. This is precisely an environment designed to nurture irrationalisms of every sort.
The escapism of her fiction, Brownlee Implies, is of a different kind -- readers are invited to explore alternative subjectivities and to interrogate social norms.
11 have given rise to a greater need for escapism. While some of the solutions may seem obvious (think vices), less toxic alternatives are the way to go.
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It is more like doing homework than reading futuristic escapism. However, maintaining a position so near the epicenter of a technologies convergence that is transforming not only our organizations, but our entire society (as Tapscott argues so well), will require our continual learning.
And a vital faith is more like an organism or a work of art than it is like a cafeteria tray." At its worst, he notes, this pastiche spirituality "can be a kind of private escapism to titillate oneself."