varix

(redirected from esophageal varices)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to esophageal varices: esophageal reflux, Esophageal cancer
?Note: This page may contain content that is offensive or inappropriate for some readers.

varix

[′var·iks]
(invertebrate zoology)
A conspicuous ridge across each whorl of certain univalves marking the ancestral position of the outer lip of the aperture.
(medicine)
A dilated and tortuous vein, artery, or lymphatic vessel.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
MELD score and hepatocellular carcinoma identify patients at different risk of short-term mortality among cirrhotics bleeding from esophageal varices. J Hepatol 2005; 42: 820-825.
The method that has proven to be the best in controlling acute variceal hemorrhage is endoscopic banding of the esophageal varices. When banding is not possible, injecting the varices with scarring substances also can be used.
Portal hypertension usually manifests by splenomegaly, signs of esophageal varices (hematemesis or melena), ascites, encephalopathy, or hemorrhoids.
Patients with cirrhosis are eventually confronted with the development of esophageal varices due to portal hypertension and esophageal variceal bleeding is the most common and potentially lethal complication of liver cirrhosis, occurring at an incidence of 30-40% and carrying a mortality of rate of 30-50%.
All patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for the assessment of esophageal varices as an endoscopic finding of portal hypertension.
Bengmark, "Isobutyl 2-cyanoacrylate (bucrylate) in obliteration of gastric coronary vein and esophageal varices," American Journal of Roentgenology, vol.
Concurrent esophageal varices were graded according to the Japanese Society of Portal Hypertension [10].
Which patients with cirrhosis should undergo endoscopic screening for esophageal varices detection?
Unique to this case was the lack of prior identified esophageal varices on routine surveillance endoscopy or imaging from six months prior to this presentation.
Upper GI endoscopy and colonoscopy were performed independently, and the presence or absence of esophageal varices (EV), gastric varices (GV), portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG), and portal hypertensive colonopathy (PHC) was determined.
GI bleed was mainly from esophageal varices. Gastro-esophageal variceal (GEV) hemorrhage is a major complication of portal hypertension resulting from CLD and is a common cause of admission to our hospital.
The inclusion criteria are: (1) Definitive evidence of the pancreatic body and tail carcinoma; (2) portal hypertension symptoms, such as splenomegaly, gastric varices with or without esophageal varices, plus positive findings shown by computed tomography or gastroscope; (3) finding early presence of gastroesophageal varices, hematemesis, melena or splenomegaly, often as initial clinical manifestations.