Arcane

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Arcane

(pop culture)
Created by Len Wein and Bernie Wrightson, Anton Arcane debuted in Swamp Thing vol. 1 #2 (1972–1973). He appears as a spindly scientist and amateur occultist from a Balkan nation who is obsessed by two desires: the achievement of power and eternal life. During World War II, he mistakenly allies himself with the Nazis, including the Führer himself, only to venture deeper into the world of sorcery and debauchery, along the way creating creatures such as the horrific, artificial life forms the Un-Men and the Patchwork Man, assembled from decaying body parts. Although Arcane became immortal, his human body aged. Seeking out the Swamp Thing, Arcane offered him humanity in exchange for using his powerful plant body for himself. Swamp Thing agreed and was magically transformed into Alec Holland. However, when Holland realized that Arcane would use Swamp Thing's monstrous body to make himself ruler of the world, he quickly reverted the process. Arcane fled, seemingly plummeting to his death. The encounter was not the death of Arcane, nor was it the last time Arcane and Swamp Thing would go head to head. Arcane has assumed many forms over the years, including the body of an Un- Men, an insectoid creature, and the body of his niece Abigail's husband, Matthew Cable, during which Arcane developed strong telekinetic powers. Arcane died in one of his last Swamp Thing encounters and was damned to a life in hell. After years of underworld punishment, he was made a minor demon in Beelzebub's ranks and emerged as a 12- feet-tall, 2,000-pound, deformed, gargoyle-like eyesore with amazing strength and quick-footedness (as disclosed in Swamp Thing vol. 2 #96, 1990). Later, Arcane redeemed himself, but he was eventually (perhaps inevitably) cast out of heaven and back into hell. He returned to Louisiana intent on appropriating Swamp Thing's body as a permanent earthly vessel for his soul, but was defeated and returned to hell to suffer eternal torment yet again. A quote from one of his demon lovers who returned to Earth with him put it thusly: “And when they write about Arcane, they should say that he dragged Hell in his wake” (Swamp Thing vol. 4 #11, 2005). Anton Arcane has enjoyed many forays into the media world outside of comics' pages. Portrayed by Louis Jourdan, Arcane can be seen in the Wes Craven–directed feature film Swamp Thing (1982) and the Jim Wynorski–directed sequel Return of the Swamp Thing (1989). He regularly appeared (portrayed by Mark Lindsay Chapman) in FOX's live-action television series Swamp Thing (1990–1993), as well as the FOX animated Swamp Thing television series (1990), voiced by Don Francks. Based on the Swamp Thing toy line by Kenner and inspired by the success of the Swamp Thing comic book and films, the animated show chronicled Swamp Thing's battle with Arcane and the Un-Men. The series, which lasted only five episodes, was produced by DIC.
The Supervillain Book: The Evil Side of Comics and Hollywood © 2006 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is a measure of truth to Strauss's argument that the esoteric character of parables, which Maimonides ascribes to the Books of the Prophets and to the Rabbis, is replaced in the Guide by an esotericism based on contradictions.
As Strauss pointed out, modern esotericism is easier to penetrate than its ancient and medieval predecessors.
Hidden intercourse; eros and sexuality in the history of Western esotericism.
Perhaps the strongest and most intriguing aspect of Curley's essay is his extensive discussion of the role of esotericism in Augustine, in the Contra Academicos, and more generally in pagan and patristic literature (chap.
An introduction to western esotericism; essays in the hidden meaning of literature, groups, and games.
Finally there are uncomfortable hints of esotericism in Halton's analysis that carry his romanticism too far and can only frustrate his aims.
Despite its pervasive influence on Western culture, esotericism has largely been discounted as the antithesis of both rationality and traditional faith, rather than viewed as a quest throughout history to unveil the reality behind illusion.
For Corbin there is no doubt that Western philosophy developed an agnosticism which has paralyzed it for generations, whereas the Shiite theosophical metaphysics of esotericism may preserve a metaphysics whose object is the discovery and examination of the spiritual universe.
Here Tourage (religion and Islam, Colgate U.) draws upon recent interpretations of medieval kabbalistic texts to analyze the links between eroticism and the esotericism of the Mathnawi.
Lampert thus argues that esotericism in philosophy was not instituted simply in fight of the philosopher's self-interest: it is chosen through profound deliberation upon the relationship between the political order and philosophy, and out of a philanthropic and moral desire based on that deliberation to assist other human beings insofar as they can be assisted without actually harming them.
In these 12 essays contributors describe responses to western esotericism and the polemics that result.
Magic and mysticism; an introduction to Western esotericism.