essential hypertension


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essential hypertension

[i′sen·chəl ‚hī·pər′ten·chən]
(medicine)
Elevation of the systemic blood pressure, of unknown origin. Also known as primary hypertension.
References in periodicals archive ?
In essential hypertension, structural and functional changes occur in the blood vessels along with endothelial dysfunction and increased sympathetic activity, leading to arterial stiffness and raised PSV.
Mean age of all the patients was 30.8+-7.1 years, while for patients having essential hypertension it was 30.97+-7.1 years, whereas, for those with primary hyperaldosteronism it was 29.25+-7.1 years (Table-1).
Effect of antihypertensive treatment on endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation in patients with essential hypertension. J Am Coll Cardiol 1993; 21: 1145-51.
Relationship of bradykinin B2 receptor gene polymorphism with essential hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy.
Lu et al., "Association of Ala589Ser polymorphism of WNK4 gene with essential hypertension in a high-risk Chinese population," The Journal of Physiological Sciences, vol.
Later on, a similar increase in serum PTH was demonstrated in association with increased urinary calcium excretion [57], lower serum calcium concentrations [58], and comparable vitamin D levels [59] in patients with primary aldosteronism in comparison to patients with essential hypertension. Consistent with these findings, increased prevalence of osteoporosis and increased risk of bone fracture have been reported in patients with primary aldosteronism who were recruited in different geographical areas and were compared to matched patients with essential hypertension [60, 61].
Earlier studies have shown that ACE inhibitors are highly effective in the treatment of essential hypertension in reducing both SBP and DBP.
Other factors that have been associated with essential hypertension include obesity, diabetes stress, insufficient intake of potassium, calcium, magnesium and lack of physical activity.
Practically everyone, i.e., more than 95 percent of all people, will develop essential hypertension at some point in their life, although some at a much later age than others.
We call it essential hypertension. The remaining five per cent is due to renal disease, hormonal disease (pheochromocytoma) and congenital coarctation (narrowing) of the aorta."
The study included a total of 80 subjects, 40 patients with diffuse renal parenchymal disease associated with hypertension and 40 patients with essential hypertension. Out of the 40 patients with diffuse renal parenchymal disease, 14 had been diagnosed with glomerulonephritis and 26 with tubulointerstitial disease.

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