estivation


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estivation

[‚es·tə′vā·shən]
(physiology)
The adaptation of certain animals to the conditions of summer, or the taking on of certain modifications, which enables them to survive a hot, dry summer.
The dormant condition of an organism during the summer.
References in periodicals archive ?
The adaptive advantage of estivation is that it economizes water and reduces energy loss.
The onset of hibernation or estivation in juvenile mammals is different from that in adults.
blandingii can make long overland movements (up to >1 km) during nesting forays (Sexton, 1995; Piepgras and Lang, 2000; Joyal et al., 2001), between wetlands (Piepgras and Lang, 2000; Rowe and Moll, 1991), and is occasionally found in terrestrial habitats during bouts of estivation (Ross and Anderson, 1990; Joyal et al., 2001).
American spadefoot toads (Scaphiopus), for example, spend most of the year in estivation up to 3 ft (1 m) below the soil surface.
Markedly, AQP2-like genes are present between faim2 and racgapl in the coelacanth genome (Finn et al., 2014), and type 2-like AQP (AQP0p) is expressed in the kidney of lungfish Protopterus annectens Owen, 1839 during terrestrial estivation (Konno et al., 2010) (Table 1).
In freshwater turtles, responses to drought may include subterranean estivation, particularly by relatively small-bodied species, or overland migration to larger and less ephemeral habitats (Gibbons et al., 1983).
The plants turn green again, and ground squirrels and tortoises awake from their estivation period.
The ambient and physiological conditions determining the start of estivation are unclear, but C.
* Lungfish curl from the tail first with the snout pointing upward in estivation burrows (Johnels and Svennson, 1954; Greenwood, 1986).
Sonoran mud turtles frequently move between aquatic and terrestrial habitats, including movements among pools and movements into terrestrial estivation sites (van Loben Sels et al., 1997; Stone, 2001; Ligon and Stone, 2003; Hall and Steidl, 2007).
- Skeletochronology can be used in animals that exhibit annual cycles of growth, typically associated with warmer or wetter periods, and torpor or estivation associated with cooler or drier periods.
Regulation of glycolysis in the land snail Oreohelix during estivation and artificial hypercapnia.