tarragon

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tarragon

(târ`əgŏn), perennial aromatic Old World herb (Artemisia dracunculus) of the family Asteraceae (asteraster
[Gr.,=star], common name for the Asteraceae (Compositae), the aster family, in North America, name for plants of the genus Aster, sometimes called wild asters, and for a related plant more correctly called China aster (Callistephus chinensis
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 family), of the same genus as wormwood and sagebrush. It has long been cultivated in Europe and W Asia for its leaves, used for flavoring vinegar, salads, sauces, soups, and pickles. Its essential oil, sometimes called estragon, is occasionally used in perfume or, in the Old World, medicinally to stimulate appetite or as a diuretic. Tarragon is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Asterales, family Asteraceae.
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tarragon

tarragon

Slender branched stems with very thin silvery leaves. Cluster of small yellow-green flowers. French Tarragon rarely has flowers. Soup flavoring. Used to thin blood, Insomnia, nausea, hiccups, hyperactivity, stimulates appetite, helps digestion, especially oily foods. Smells a little like anise, tastes like licorice. Also used to expel worms. Bugs and pests hate it’s smell, so it’s good to grow together with other plants in a garden.Do not use if pregnant (uterine stimulant)

Tarragon

 

the foliage of Artemisia dracunculus. It is used as an herb, especially in Transcaucasia.


Tarragon

 

(Artemisia dracunculus), a perennial plant of the family Compositae. The herbaceous stem is 60–125 cm tall. The leaves are lanceolate-linear, and the white flowers are in round heads.

Tarragon is native to Mongolia and Southern Siberia. It is also distributed in Asia Minor, Middle Asia, Mongolia, North China, and North America. The plant is cultivated in Iran, India, the USA, Brazil, Sri Lanka, Great Britain, the Federal Republic of Germany, Hungary, Bulgaria, and the USSR (in Transcaucasia). The aromatic leaves are used as salad greens and as condiments or seasonings. They are also used for pickling vegetables.

Tarragon requires fertile soils. The seedlings are planted in open ground and spaced about 25 cm apart. In the south tarragon overwinters well in open ground; in the north it is covered with humus. Tarragon can be cultivated on the same plot for ten to 15 years.

REFERENCE

Kapelev, I. G., and V. I. Mashanov. Prianoaromaticheskie rasteniia. Simferopol’, 1973.

tarragon

[′tar·ə‚gän]
(food engineering)
A herb prepared from the pungent leaves of the tarragon tree (Artemisia dracunculus).

tarragon

1. an aromatic perennial plant, Artemisia dracunculus, of the Old World, having whitish flowers and small toothed leaves, which are used as seasoning: family Asteraceae (composites)
2. the leaves of this plant
References in periodicals archive ?
"We're still active, but, like Vladimir and Estragon, we know about aches and pains!" Stewart adds: "Ian and I are both Northerners, separated only by the Pennines, and I think there's another element there that gives us a shared understanding for the play." Since Godot's British premiere in 1955, which led Harold Hobson, a drama critic of the Sunday Times, to call it "the most unforgettable and important" night of his theatergoing life, the play has been staged in more than 100 countries.
1 taza de hojas de estragon y 1 taza de perejil italiano
Estragon's unconsciously-uttered statements have a close connection with their previous social life and identity:
Estragon (Richard Heap) and Vladimir (Peter Cadden) swap philosophies, criticisms and insults as they wait for the enigmatic Godot.
The SERDs are believed to hold a promising potential for the treatment of hormone receptor-positive breast cancer and other cancers associated with the estragon receptor.
In this regard it is worth revisiting the conversation of Vladimir and Estragon who engage in pointless conversation with Pozzo and Lucky periodically turning up to inform the two protagonists that Godot will come tomorrow, but Godot never shows up.
Often compared to "a piece of jazz music, to which everyone must listen for whatever one may find in it" (Esslin, xv), in En Attendant Godot Beckett sketches the portraits of two tramps, named Vladimir and Estragon, who are waiting in an open road for a mysterious personage, Godot.
Vladimir y Estragon: no se saben sus antecedentes, en la microsecuencia inicial, simplemente aparecen en escena y, por lo que se dice de ellos se afirma que son dos vagabundos; por ejemplo, sus bienes son pocos y los identifican: Vladimir tiene un sombrero, Estragon posee unos zapatos y una zanahoria como alimento; "otra teoria es que podrian ser refugiados o solda dos desplazados de un conflicto como la Segunda Guerra Mundial (...) que inspiro mucho a Beckett" (Biblioteca Publica de Huelva, 2007).
"Where do you go from here?" the immortal words of the two geezers - Estragon and Vladimir - the main characters of Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot, perhaps best describe the play that cannot be defined in one simple explanation.
In "Waiting for Godot," the friendship between Vladimir (Stewart) and Estragon (McKellen) is the only thing that's keeping Western civilization from sinking back into the primordial mud.
McKellen playe a d Estragon and Stewart Vladimir in Waiting for Godot at the Theatre Royal in London's West End four years ago.