estuarine circulation

estuarine circulation

[′es·chə·wə‚rēn ‚sər·kyə¦lā·shən]
(oceanography)
In an estuary, the outflow (seaward) of low-salinity surface water over a deeper inflowing layer of dense, high-salinity water.
References in periodicals archive ?
El Nino, temperature limitation, range expansion, invasive species, wind reversed estuarine circulation, Olympic Peninsula Countercurrent
Columbia River estuarine circulation is influenced by both riverine processes (e.g., seasonal flow cycles) and ocean processes (e.g., wind-forced upwelling and daily tidal inundation) and their interactions, which result in circulation patterns and water column properties that vary at temporal scales ranging from minutes to years (Jay and Smith, 1990; Chawla et al., 2008; Roegner et al., 2010b).
The module is based on an estuarine circulation model (MacCready, 2007) and a particle-tracking algorithm developed by Dr.
The Gulf of Nicoya is characterized by an estuarine circulation (Fig.
This freshwater influx then forces estuarine circulation in the southern strait, which is characterized by a net outflow of low salinity water toward Juan de Fuca Strait in the upper layer (<50 m depth), and a net northward inflow of high salinity water in the lower part of the water column that reaches the Strait of Georgia in late summer (Mosher and Thomson, 2002).
Pliny deduced that surface and bottom currents were flowing in opposite directions, and he provided the first written documentation of what we now call the "estuarine circulation."
Officer CB (1983) Physics of estuarine circulation. In 'Estuarine sand enclosed seas'.
Data collected at the monitoring sites are also useful for investigating problems related to estuarine circulation. For instance, because Buoy 126 lies in close proximity to Little Egg Inlet, investigators have been able to examine the effects of ocean water transported into Great Bay by tidal currents.
Subsequently, estuarine circulation is important in determining sediment transport and distribution (Dyer 1979).
When the wind blew from the northeast (downstream), stratification decreased, as bottom waters, which were more saline, replaced surface waters, which were rapidly flushed out of the estuary by both wind and gravitational forces in classic estuarine circulation. When the wind blew from the southwest (upstream), downstream transport was reduced, and fresh water accumulated in the surface waters, progressively increasing stratification.
ABSTRACT Planktonic larvae of resident, oyster reef-associated decapods and fishes are subject to variable transport and retention whenever estuarine circulation is altered by freshwater inflow.
The rivers that drive Long Island Sound's estuarine circulation discharge along its broad northern flank.