eternal

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eternal

denoting or relating to that which is without beginning and end, regarded as an attribute of God
References in periodicals archive ?
Self-inscription is the failure of this alliance--the failure of eternality and sameness.
Plato's arguments in these conversations are around several axes: birth of anti anything from itself, soul cannot be transformable, Divinity of self, tendency of soul to sensible or reasonable things, rejecting opposite, soul is indestructible with its evil, source movement of the soul, eternality of soul, seeking permanent happiness (Refer to Hossein Zadeh and Mesbah, 113 and 117).
29 This theme of eternality recurs throughout his statement (e.
We come to recognize that the prolonged--if subdued--moan we've been hearing throughout "In Gallipoli" is the music of Love's eternality.
Toward the end of his career, when Sadra wrote the Asfar, Sadra grapples with Dawud al-QaysarI's notion that the eternality of punishment in hell does not contradict the possibility of its cessation, since each human, depending on their constitution, may come to experience hell without it being a kind of suffering.
Just as they deny the Jewish belief in exile, so too they deny the eternality of the soul.
We are left with at least two ways of viewing nature in the poem: the first nature as destroyer, continuously undermining any ideals of stability, solidity, or fixture; and the second, as a form of permanence and eternality (the ideological)--as monument, in the same way Wordsworths' poem "Yew Trees," speaks of a "living thing/Produced too slowly ever to decay" (10-11).
I take it that Anselm's commitment to God's timeless eternality precludes any kind of becoming from belonging to God.
Tanavoli aims to invoke the eternality of God, next to which everything else lacks permanence, but was also drawn to the word due to the resemblance between its written shape and the human body.
The same God of Israel, affirmed by both Jews and Christians and who certainly was affirmed by the original Jewish followers of Jesus and later his gentile followers as well, who lovingly entered into B'rith with Am Yisrael at Har Sinai and symbolized by the gracious and unmerited gift of the Holy Torah itself to a seemingly unworthy people again lovingly offered a second unmerited gift, but this time to all humanity (and one would therefore assume Jews included), namely, God's only begotten son translated into human form, whose human death and return to full divinity opened the door to an eternality freed from sin for all humanity upon its acceptance of him.
Loving bonds between family members serve an evolutionary purpose, but they are not in any way evidence for the eternality of our individual minds, as painful as this realization is.
Part 1 has chapters on the Trinity and on (alleged) divine properties like simplicity, omnipotence, omniscience, omnipresence, eternality, and perfect goodness.