sinus

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Related to ethmoid sinus: Sphenoid sinus

sinus,

cavity or hollow space in the body, usually filled with air or blood. In humans the paranasal sinuses, mucus-lined cavities in the bones of the face, are connected by passageways to the nose and probably help to warm and moisten inhaled air. When drainage from them is blocked, as after a cold, these sinuses often become infected, a condition called sinusitis. The accumulation of pus results in pressure, headaches, pain, and general discomfort. In invertebrates one of the spaces among the muscles and viscera through which blood returns to the heart is also known as a sinus.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

sinus

(sÿ -nŭs) A semienclosed break along the borders of a lunar mare or in a scarp. The word is used in the approved name of such a feature on the Moon. (Latin: bay)
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Sinus

 

in anatomy, a cavity, protrusion, or long closed channel. In vertebrates (including man), the term “sinus” refers to a channel filled with venous blood in the dura mater. The cavity in some cranial bones is also called a sinus. [23–1297–]

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

sinus

[′sī·nəs]
(biology)
A cavity, recess, or depression in an organ, tissue, or other part of an animal body.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sinus

1. Anatomy
a. any bodily cavity or hollow space
b. a large channel for venous blood, esp between the brain and the skull
c. any of the air cavities in the cranial bones
2. Pathol a passage leading to a cavity containing pus
3. Botany a small rounded notch between two lobes of a leaf, petal, etc.
4. an irregularly shaped cavity
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Human ethmoid sinus mucosa: a promising novel tissue source of mesenchymal progenitor cells.
Factors predicting survival for cancer of the ethmoid sinus. Am J Rhinol 2002;16(5):281-286.
A case with sinonasal teratocarcinosarcoma in the nasal cavity and ethmoid sinus. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol 2006; 263: 586-91.
Computed tomography (CT) of the paranasal sinuses revealed an extensive osteoma of the left ethmoid sinus and left nasal passage (figure, B).
Intersect ENT announced publication of results from a randomized pivotal Phase III study of the company's Sinuva Sinus Implant, a new targeted approach to treating recurrent nasal polyp disease in patients who have had previous ethmoid sinus surgery.
Available literature describes presentation of RCC metastasis as a solitary periorbital [27] and orbital mass [28], as a frontal sinus mass [29], as an ethmoid sinus mass [30, 31], in the nasal cavity [32,33], in the maxillary [34, 35], and sphenoid sinus [36-38].
The company markets two steroid releasing implants, Propel and Propel mini, which are used in patients with chronic sinusitis undergoing ethmoid sinus surgery.
Orbital manifestations were secondary to frontal sinus disease in 2 (14.28%) patient, ethmoid sinus disease in 5 (35.71%), maxillary sinus disease in 5 (35.71%) patients.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a round mass in the left nasal cavity, involving the sphenoid sinus and ethmoid sinus and compressing the left orbit and nasal septum, but without intracranial component (Figure 1).
Pneumatization from the anterior ethmoid sinus can invade adjacent osseous structures and form paranasal sinus cells.
Nasal endoscopic examination revealed only slight edematous mucosa in the bilateral nasal cavity and the ethmoid sinus. The opening of the right sphenoid sinus was closed by the granulation covered with mucosa, and we could not look into the inside of the sinus.