ethnic marker

ethnic marker

the means whereby the social boundaries between ETHNIC GROUPS are maintained. Territoriality, history, LANGUAGE, and SYMBOLS may all serve as ethnic markers emphasizing distinctions between one ethnic group and another.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
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Apart from the relentless and calculated efforts, there exists not a single ethnic marker in India that can act as a binding force and an instrument of shared identity for India to claim its population as one nation.
One young Julyamsh dancer liked her bead hat and summed up one of the major functions of these hats as an ethnic marker; "It's really cool because when I dance at other powwows, everybody knows where I'm from."
While Kelantanese Thais venerate both the Sultan and the Thai monarchy, they view their respect of the Thai monarchy strictly as an ethnic marker, not as political deference (p.
OBSERVATION: The present study reveals characteristic ethnic marker of each community examined and brings forth some striking features.
It is not surprising then that these Afro-Caribbean immigrants' involvement in business, legal and otherwise, became a conspicuous ethnic marker of their settlement and interaction in Harlem (Watkins-Owens 1996, 126).
In contrast, a growing population of Haredi (self-consciously ultra-traditional, "God-fearing") Jews employ Yiddish as an ethnic marker to deliberately separate themselves from a pluralistic Canadian society.
(46) Since language is an ethnic marker this is strong evidence that the ethnic myth of common descent usually has a basis in fact.
As an ethnic marker, Minami's name already represents a large area of potential ambivalence in Minami's ethnic identity.
She insists that with the destruction of the Temple it was only the second levitical prohibition concerning the niddah, forbidden marital contact, that continued in force as an ethnic marker to distinguish Jews from their neighbors.
(2.) But see Jones-Correa and Leal (1996) for a discussion of LNPS data on panethnicity as an important secondary ethnic marker.
George argues that religion is not an ethnic marker for the "people of the headwaters," many of whom have converted from the mappurondo religious order to either Christianity or Islam.

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