ethnobotany

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ethnobotany

[¦eth·nō′bät·ən·ē]
(anthropology)
The study of how cultures utilize plants and plant products.
References in periodicals archive ?
The identification and collection of plant material from specific locality is the job of ethnobotanist [21].
Gary Paul Nabhan is an agricultural ecologist, ethnobotanist and writer whose work has focused primarily on the desert Southwest.
The enthusiastic ethnobotanist is bringing his 'Homegrown Revolution' to the family-owned garden centre in Shelley on Sunday, April 6 and will also be signing copies of his latest book James Wong's Homegrown Revolution.
Ethnobotanist Wade Davis (1985, 1988) studied Haiti in interdisciplinary fashion and came to understand that zombies are part of the cultural milieu.
Ethnobotanist and botanical artist Eisenberg presents her participatory ethnographic research and partnership with the Aymara Indians in the Andes Mountains of northern Chile.
The Texan visionary, whose passion for herbal medicine earned him the nickname "Herbal Cowboy," together with two internationally respected medicinal plant experts--the eminent ethnobotanist James A.
Interestingly though, I remember ethnobotanist James Wong (who is now endorsing the cucamelon) advising how to grow "pomatoes" a few years ago and although the name is different, the theory is the same.
One of the best known is that of Wade Davis, a Harvard ethnobotanist who wrote The Serpent and the Rainbow in 1985.
A Harvard-trained ethnobotanist, Davis began his career as a plant explorer before his investigations into folk preparations linked to the creation of zombies in Haiti resulted in his bestselling The Serpent and the Rainbow: A Harvard Scientist's Astonishing Journey into the Secret Societies of Haitian Voodoo, Zombis and Magic and a film spinoff.
Annick Swenson, a brilliant but prickly ethnobotanist whose research in the remote Amazon rain forest could revolutionize fertility and childbirth.
Drawing on the research of ethnobotanist Selena Ahmed, Michael Freeman's text and photographs record every aspect of what survives of this exchange, from the grading of the leaves to a team of heavily laden yaks fording a river, the way yaks have been doing for a millennium.