ethnobotany

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ethnobotany

[¦eth·nō′bät·ən·ē]
(anthropology)
The study of how cultures utilize plants and plant products.
References in periodicals archive ?
She presents a very different perspective from the plant hunters of today, the ethnobotanists. In this field, anthropologists, botanists, and physicians are collaborating with indigenous peoples to document the plants they live with and how they use them.
Indian ethnobotanists have been working to document Patalkot's traditional culture and knowledge, to ensure that it is not lost with the current generation of elders, or appropriated via commercial patents.
An international group of veterinary clinicians, animal scientists, pharmacists, chemists, and ethnobotanists detail the plants used, the conditions for which they are used, the ways the plant material is treated prior to use, general research methods for testing effects and safety, the legal aspects of research, the chemical examination of extracts, and several chapters on uses in different countries around the world.
Ethnobotanists study a region, its people and culture, plants, the traditional use of the plants and much more.
Ethnobotanists studying Native American cultures found a strong preference for the bur oak, sometimes called the mossycup oak.
This trend appears to be reversing in the last decade due to recent discoveries by a growing group of medical anthropologists, ethnobotanists and ethnopharmacologists.
However, this book is also suitable able for health profession students, ethnobotanists or even a lay person--anyone seeking to gain some knowledge of the exciting and enigmatic world of natural medicines.
"Duke's handbook Of Medicinal Plants Of The Bible" is a 528-page compendium of superbly organized and presented information on biblical plants that provides both academicians and non-specialist general readers with a complete, descriptive listing of the herbs that, based on citations, scholars and ethnobotanists feel were utilized by the people of the biblical era.
This book's appeal is to all students of plants and their uses, including health-care professionals, anthropologists, plant taxonomists, and ethnobotanists.
Conceptually it was a dream: Backed by the biggest names in the field, including Harvard's Richard Schultes, the modern "father of ethnobotany," some of the brightest young botanists, ethnobotanists, and chemists in the world and $200 million of Eli Lilly's funding, it was hoped that Shaman would be able to quickly find new plants that could be parlayed--either directly or through synthetics modeled after the plant alkaloids--into important pharmaceuticals.