ethnobotany


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ethnobotany

[¦eth·nō′bät·ən·ē]
(anthropology)
The study of how cultures utilize plants and plant products.
References in periodicals archive ?
A comparative ethnobotany of Aboriginal processing methods and consumption of Australian Bowenia, Cycas, Macrozamia and Lepidozamia species', Technical Reports of the Australian Museum 23 (10): 147-63.
The articles link scientific botany to political issues like imperialism, social networking, and a culturally influenced taxonomy; ethnobotany to folkloristics and education; scientific botanical practice to nature writing and leisure walks through the landscape; and economic and religious practices to the function of plant species.
Ethnobotany of the Ese Ejja: plants, health, and change in an Amazonian society.
Schultes is considered the father of modern ethnobotany because he brought attention to the wealth of botanical information that indigenous peoples possess and emphasized that this was a resource that was rapidly disappearing as once-isolated tribes were touched by civilization.
Our two most popular classes so far have been applied ethnobotany and principles and pathways beyond sustainability.
Pals drew my attention to the American Indian ethnobotany database on Foods, drugs, dyes and fibres of native North American peoples by the American anthropologist Dan Moerman (1996).
Recalma-Clutesi has found a passion for the media arts, and has developed expertise in ethnobotany.
Ethnobotany in the new Europe; people, health, and wild plant resources.
The article written by Mary Ellen Volansky, RDH, MS, "An Ethnobotany and Oral Hygiene Interplay: A Dental Hygienist Working With the Siletz Indians of Oregon," enlightens us on the vital role that culture, folk medicine, tradition and family values have on our day-to-day interactions.
A third author, Gustav Vilbaste (1885-1967), pioneer of Estonian ethnobotany, documented with great precision the places of origin of the described uses; unfortunately, he published only two volumes of a proposed 5-volume book (Vilberg 1934-1935).
With information contributions by Beverly Ortiz, "After the First Full Moon in April: A Sourcebook of Herbal Medicine from a California Indian Elder" is a unique and highly prized addition to personal, professional, community, and academic library collections in the diverse fields of Ethnobotany, Ethnomedicine, Environmental Anthropology, Native American Studies, and California History.
Simply put, ethnobotany is the study of the relationship between people and plants.