ethnobotany


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

ethnobotany

[¦eth·nō′bät·ən·ē]
(anthropology)
The study of how cultures utilize plants and plant products.
References in periodicals archive ?
In spite of the collaboration of specialists and Indigenous informants, an Aboriginal perspective of plant use was not guaranteed; the Bush Medicine Project has produced a listing of medicinal plants chosen by the research team for the possible chemical basis to their efficacy--'medical ethnobotany' (Telban 1988).
One reason ethnoentomology has not caught up to ethnobotany is the lack of accurate documentation of native uses of insects.
Children's activities in the Creative Corner are once again offered, as is an ethnobotany tour, this time with a Navajo guide pointing out the plants traditionally used by the Navajo people.
Meanwhile, although more Western students are becoming interested in ethnobotany, many can't hack the primitive lifestyle required for field research or lack the patience and skill to establish rapport with indigenous people.
"Historically, ethnobotany and forest conservation projects have not been conducted with public health and medical projects," King and coauthors noted in the 1996 book Valuing Local Knowledge: Indigenous People and Intellectual Property Rights.
It includes more information on topics such as Amazonia, freshwater fishes, ethnobotany, human ecology, and the effects of deforestation.
Topics covered include forest ecosystem restoration, ethnobotany, fire and ecosystem management, community forestry, wood and forest products certification, the "deep ecology" movement vs the "shallow ecology movement", and current ecoforestry practices and techniques.
"Ethnobotany" in its anthropological sense is the analysis of the way a particular ethnic group perceives, categorizes and uses its botanic environment, not merely the way that group uses plants.
In fact, these latter essays represent recent innovations in archaeology, ethnology, linguistics, and ethnobotany that, together with newly exploited archival materials, have informed the emerging synthesis.
In his introduction, he speculates on why so few of these plants were used medically by early European pioneers and settlers of the prairies and why so little scientific attention has been paid to the ethnobotany of the prairies.