ethnocentrism

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ethnocentrism,

the feeling that one's group has a mode of living, values, and patterns of adaptation that are superior to those of other groups. It is coupled with a generalized contempt for members of other groups. Ethnocentrism may manifest itself in attitudes of superiority or sometimes hostility. Violence, discrimination, proselytizing, and verbal aggressiveness are other means whereby ethnocentrism may be expressed.

ethnocentrism

  1. the attitude of prejudice or mistrust towards outsiders which may exist within a social group; a way of perceiving one's own cultural group (in-group) in relation to others (out-groups). The term was introduced by W. G. SUMNER (1906) and involves the belief that one's own group is the most important, or is culturally superior to other groups. Thus, one's own culture is considered to be racially, morally and culturally of greater value or significance than that of others, and one becomes distrustful of those defined as outsiders. It also involves an incapacity to acknowledge that cultural differentiation does not imply the inferiority of those groups who are ethnically distinct from one's own.
  2. a characteristic of certain personality types. The ethnocentric personality is described by T Adorno et al. (1950) in The Authoritarian Personality (see AUTHORITARIAN PERSONALITY). Initially this study was concerned with the social and psychological aspects of anti-Semitism, but developed into a study of its more general correlates. Adorno et al. were concerned with explaining attitudes towards other ‘out-groups’ in American society, such as homosexuals and ethnic minorities, and maintained that antagonism towards one ‘out-group’ (e.g. Jews) seldom existed in isolation. They found that ethnocentrism tended to be associated with authoritarianism, dogmatism and rigidity, political and economic conservatism, and an implicit anti-democratic ideology. Thus, hostility towards one ‘out-group’ (see IN-GROUP AND OUT-GROUP) was often generalized and projected onto other ‘out-groups’. See also PREJUDICE, DISCRIMINATION, RACISM OR RACIALISM, ATTITUDE, ATTITUDE SCALE.
References in periodicals archive ?
They are now in arms against Kiir's ethnocentric totalitarian regime.
in my view, most sensible is neither to devise new, ethnocentric terms [Shoah or Porrajmos], nor try to adapt the existing ones [holocaust vs.
Most people are ethnocentric at one point or another as people best relate to their cultures.
By defining a nation's success as a function of its degree of wealth or per capita income (as this book does), corresponds directly to an "ethnocentric" mechanism within the discipline, aimed at creating a need in non-Western societies, namely, the "need" to be "developed" and "modern." Last, the ultimate weakness of the text is its failure to expand the discussion of development beyond the West.
This is not, however the reason the PA should not entertain recognising Israel as an ethnocentric Jewish state.
More specifically, our goal was to investigate the differences in purchase behavior of ethnocentric and polycentric consumer segments and thus gain insights into consumption behavior, relevant from theoretical and managerial perspectives.
Singh has ably challenged this "ethnocentric" design (not paradigm).
Derald Wing Sue, Ph.D., the pre-eminent multicultural scholar, reminds us of "ethnocentric monoculturalism," the notion that the only culture in the Western world that has any value is Western culture, and all other cultural values and practices are "primitive." Dr.
They found their respondents to be only moderately ethnocentric, and yet significant differences are discernible in their ethnocentric tendency across socio-psychological and demographic characteristics.
Based on this classification, this article proposes a model that reintroduces four variables which could have a bearing on the process of reconciliation: ethnocentric attitude, negotiating attitude, the perceived legitimacy of the adversary and outgroup trust.
Shimp and Sharma (1987) developed a consumer ethnocentrism scale (CESCALE) to measure ethnocentric tendencies of consumers towards purchasing domestic products.
We Americans tend to be ethnocentric at times; sort of an "If it ain't invented here, we're not interested" way of thinking.