ethnography

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ethnography:

see anthropologyanthropology,
classification and analysis of humans and their society, descriptively, culturally, historically, and physically. Its unique contribution to studying the bonds of human social relations has been the distinctive concept of culture.
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; ethnologyethnology
, scientific study of the origin and functioning of human cultures. It is usually considered one of the major branches of cultural anthropology, the other two being anthropological archaeology and anthropological linguistics. In the 19th cent.
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ethnography

the direct observation of an organization or small society, and the written description produced. Often the method of observation involves PARTICIPANT OBSERVATION. The ethnographic method (sometimes also referred to as FIELDWORK) is a basic method in SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY, It is also a method used in some areas of sociology, e.g. COMMUNITY STUDIES. Usually a researcher gathers data by living and working in the society or social setting being researched, seeking to immerse himself or herself as fully as possible in the activities under observation, but at the same time keeping careful records of these activities.

In anthropology, an emphasis on the importance of the ethnographic method was initially associated with the functionalist school, which encouraged an analysis of the internal structure and function of single societies rather than historical or comparative studies (see FUNCTIONALISM). However, there is no inherent reason why ethnographic and comparative approaches should not be seen as complementary or why ethnography should simply be associated with one theoretical school.

ethnography

[eth′nä·grə·fē]
(anthropology)
The branch of ethnology that deals with the description of races or ethnic groups, without attempting to analyze or compare them.
References in periodicals archive ?
The latter would be a prerequisite because the Murik realities necessitate a deeper self-knowledge by the ethnographers and the need for a critical control of the inexhaustible human capacity for defensive idealisation of oneself and others.
The book is intended as a guide for 'budding ethnographers as they take on ethnographic projects of their own'.
As Leiris later admitted in his Five Ethnographical Studies (Leiris 1950), the ethnographer undermines his own survival if he speaks too frankly and divulges the secrets of his art and actions.
Having the almost unique advantage of daily access to the ROM's Paul Kane collection," he explains, "I began to compare the sketches and oil paintings in an effort to find Kane the ethnographer and Kane the artist.
Making Music in the Polish Tatras: Tourists, Ethnographers, and Mountain Musicians.
He concludes, "Finally the Balinese peasants themselves are quite aware of all this and can and, at least to an ethnographer, do state most of it in approximately the same terms I have" (440).
From the outset, Cooley outlines the important relationship between the ethnographer and the mountain musician as typified in the historical characters of Dr.
McKennan presents the original field journals of expert Alaskan ethnographer Robert A.
In the poor suburbs, instead of the autochthonous Indians, the ethnographer found rather different travellers, the descendants of black slaves.
It is here that the ethnographer moves from conventional science's "subjects" to "subjectivities" (Tolman & Brydon-Miller, 2001), and both the "confessional tales" of van Maanen (1986), and the intensely reflective autoethnographic study (Ellis, 2004; Ellis & Bochner, 1996) emerge.
At the end of every chapter, the author included a "field journal" in which she aimed to recount some of the difficulties she encountered as a "native ethnographer.
In this lighthearted, thought-provoking book that examines the social world of children, sociologist and ethnographer William A.