ethnography

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ethnography:

see anthropologyanthropology,
classification and analysis of humans and their society, descriptively, culturally, historically, and physically. Its unique contribution to studying the bonds of human social relations has been the distinctive concept of culture.
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; ethnologyethnology
, scientific study of the origin and functioning of human cultures. It is usually considered one of the major branches of cultural anthropology, the other two being anthropological archaeology and anthropological linguistics. In the 19th cent.
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ethnography

the direct observation of an organization or small society, and the written description produced. Often the method of observation involves PARTICIPANT OBSERVATION. The ethnographic method (sometimes also referred to as FIELDWORK) is a basic method in SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY, It is also a method used in some areas of sociology, e.g. COMMUNITY STUDIES. Usually a researcher gathers data by living and working in the society or social setting being researched, seeking to immerse himself or herself as fully as possible in the activities under observation, but at the same time keeping careful records of these activities.

In anthropology, an emphasis on the importance of the ethnographic method was initially associated with the functionalist school, which encouraged an analysis of the internal structure and function of single societies rather than historical or comparative studies (see FUNCTIONALISM). However, there is no inherent reason why ethnographic and comparative approaches should not be seen as complementary or why ethnography should simply be associated with one theoretical school.

ethnography

[eth′nä·grə·fē]
(anthropology)
The branch of ethnology that deals with the description of races or ethnic groups, without attempting to analyze or compare them.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, Mialet's relationship to Hawking cannot be framed in the typical scenario of the ethnographer and the native surrounded by colonial phantoms.
As the editors of the volume Jewish Studies at the Crossroads of Anthropology and History argue, the 1970s was the era in which "the text, taken metaphorically to include the social actions that ethnographers observed as well as the archival evidence that historians gathered, emerged as an idiom of common purpose.
When the ethnographer is already part of the community, the ethnographer is able to negotiate the politics of representation and identification from a perspective of his or her own practice, or within already established relationships.
Hammersley and Atkinson, 1995: 15) Observing the research field is difficult when the ethnographer is also analysing his or her own actions as community manager in an online environment.
The fact that Russian statisticians, ethnographers, anthropologists, psychiatrists, and government officials participated in international discussions on the human sciences and their practical applications underlines the importance of the comparative context.
Although slightly redundant at times, this is a well-written book that is readily accessible to the undergraduate student, but sophisticated and rich enough to be a valuable resource for even the most experienced ethnographer.
Moreover, the consideration of the different stages of post-fieldwork processes provides the budding ethnographer with a strategy to follow after the hectic experience of fieldwork.
For Kenneth Lister, the door to a ROM art storeroom would prove to be a portal to a world that would intrigue, enchant, and some might say obsess the intrepid ethnographer for decades to come.
North By Northeast: Wabanaki, Akwesasne Mohawk, and Tuscarora Tarditional Arts" by folklorist and ethnographer Kathleen Mundell showcases the works and commentaries of thirty-five traditional Native American artists living and working primarily in Maine and New York.
As a liminal space in which Gorale "chose to exploit their identity in order to earn a living" (213), the restaurant setting offers Cooley an opportunity to reflect on his own shifting experiences as tourist, ethnographer, guest, friend, musician, dancer, local and outsider.
He discusses his role as an ethnographer in sl, but he does not mention any other ethnographers flying around sl during the time of his research, nor does he speculate on what an ethnography based on place-making might look like.
The presence of the ethnographer during shadowing may have also had an effect on participant risk behavior.