ethnography

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ethnography:

see anthropologyanthropology,
classification and analysis of humans and their society, descriptively, culturally, historically, and physically. Its unique contribution to studying the bonds of human social relations has been the distinctive concept of culture.
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; ethnologyethnology
, scientific study of the origin and functioning of human cultures. It is usually considered one of the major branches of cultural anthropology, the other two being anthropological archaeology and anthropological linguistics. In the 19th cent.
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ethnography

the direct observation of an organization or small society, and the written description produced. Often the method of observation involves PARTICIPANT OBSERVATION. The ethnographic method (sometimes also referred to as FIELDWORK) is a basic method in SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY, It is also a method used in some areas of sociology, e.g. COMMUNITY STUDIES. Usually a researcher gathers data by living and working in the society or social setting being researched, seeking to immerse himself or herself as fully as possible in the activities under observation, but at the same time keeping careful records of these activities.

In anthropology, an emphasis on the importance of the ethnographic method was initially associated with the functionalist school, which encouraged an analysis of the internal structure and function of single societies rather than historical or comparative studies (see FUNCTIONALISM). However, there is no inherent reason why ethnographic and comparative approaches should not be seen as complementary or why ethnography should simply be associated with one theoretical school.

ethnography

[eth′nä·grə·fē]
(anthropology)
The branch of ethnology that deals with the description of races or ethnic groups, without attempting to analyze or compare them.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ironically, however, sterility is an all too evident outcome of these Welsh case studies; in my judgement, virtually nothing new has been revealed or discovered in the areas targeted by 'phenomenology', and fresh interpretive insights are largely confined to ethnographically based rhetoric.
In our earlier study we suggested that this could indeed reflect a pattern of 'tossing' of the larger and heavier flint cores away from the more central, in situ zones of industrial activities (as reflected in the three main lithic concentrations noted above), towards the edges of the activity zone--essentially as ethnographically documented models would suggest.
1977) and arrows (Mason 1893; Ellis 1997) are well documented ethnographically.
He then goes on to quote Bird-David as saying, 'certainly the "native [Australian] experience" is fundamentally rooted "in a view of the country and the material world as animate entities"' (2005:74) preferring her assertions about a part of the world in which she has not done research to Munn's ethnographically based work.
At Hilazon, deposits of stone tools might be related to the ethnographically documented habit of burying the dead with significant tools, including hide-processing implements (e.
A cursory glance at the literature is sufficient to show that both the aspects of the contrast that Buka people highlight and the connections that they draw between them are ethnographically specific.
Laura Appeli-Warren in the Preface to the Diaries also wrote that Monica's "drawings are ethnographically precise.
Among the reasons for choosing this area the following were the most important: the region (but also Teleorman County as a whole) has been poorly investigated ethnographically with respect to migration (5).
Exposure of corpses is a relatively common ethnographically and archaeologically documented practice amongst many societies around the world (e.
The archaeological record indicated that Pleistocene societies were less varied than those of the later Holocene and ethnographically documented periods, in other words, Aboriginal societies changed from simple to complex.
Ethnographically rich and detailed, this book foregrounds the human stories, both immigrant and non-immigrant, that often get lost behind polarizing rhetoric about undocumented migration.
Carlson demonstrates that documents still matter in the understanding the Aboriginal past when critically examined ethnographically and historiographically.