ethyl carbamate


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ethyl carbamate

[¦eth·əl ′kär·bə‚māt]
(organic chemistry)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Acetaldehyde, acrolein, formaldehyde and ethyl carbamate are genotoxic compounds and margin of exposure (MOE) must be used in risk characterization considering the benchmark dose lower confidence limit (BMDL10) as toxicological parameter in the in the calculation:
Sharypov, "Ethyl carbamate in foods and beverages--a review," Environmental Chemistry Letters, vol.
The most prevalent problem was ethyl carbamate contamination with 29 samples above the AMPHORA limit of 0.4 mg/l; 17 samples were higher than 1 mg/l, and 10 samples showed very high contamination above 2 mg/l.
Ethyl carbamate forms from reactions with barley when whisky is being distilled and has been proven to cause cancer in animals.
It found Laphroaig was the most contaminated with 239 micrograms of ethyl carbamate per litre compared to an average of 30 in younger whiskies.
Maximum levels of ethyl carbamate In table wines 30 ppb In fortified wines 100 ppb In distilled spirits 150 ppb In fruit brandies and liqueurs 400 ppb In sake 200 ppb Source: Health Canada This is clearly not something you want a lot of in your wine.
And in another of those damned-if-you-do, damned-if-you-don't scenarios, both excessively low YAN and excessively high YAN can promote formation of urea, which can be transformed into ethyl carbamate, a likely carcinogen.
The huge compilation of data over time allows for some very interesting regional and national wine quality comparisons, like the accompanying illustration of ethyl carbamate levels in wines from six countries/continents.
* Conducted research mandated by FDA that demonstrated ethyl carbamate is a natural carcinogen, a product of yeast metabolism.
Ethyl carbamate can be a carcinogen and tiny amounts occur in fermented products, bread and some juices.
Prise de Mousse yeast doesn't excrete urea, for example, which makes it preferable to either Montrachet or Epernay II if later storage conditions for the wine are likely to encourage ethyl carbamate formation.