etiolation

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etiolation

[‚ed·ē·ə′lā·shən]
(botany)
The yellowing or whitening of green plant parts grown in darkness.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The trope emerges repeatedly in Orwell's fiction as a crisis of the male body, "etiolated," the very site of desire, in some way eroded, unable to live up to Miller's demands of it.
Melatonin stimulates the expansion of etiolated lupin cotyledons.
Cytokinins accelerate chloroplast differentiation as well as regulate and stimulate chlorophyll (Chl) production in etiolated cucumber cotyledons.
WouldMarjorie Bowles, the local pharmacist, one day realize that life was notmerely waking and working and supper and television, that another musicplayed somewhere, there was another view somewhere, where the flowerswere sweeter, the breezes warmer, where toil and hardship were not theonly features of an etiolated, faded landscape?
William Clark implies a similar connection through his adjacent descriptions of Firbank's "etiolated plotless structure" and the "minority of male degenerates, powdered, pale, and languorous" that populate his novels (138).
Kalia had been in the news briefly in August 2014 at the height of the Ebola crisis and was often obliquely referred to in the generally etiolated newspaper accounts.
Weeds thwacked against the bumper and insects froze in time as the cruiser headlights kindled them into etiolated rods and lucent splayed fillets.
It remains to be seen whether this etiolated view will find acceptance.
Its creative destruction engendered the English working class and its way of life, and then, by turn, made that class redundant and etiolated its culture.
In this etiolated gold standard, only the United States would need to fix its money to gold in the fashion just mentioned.
This species lives on the basal parts of grasses close to soil level and often on etiolated stems under stones.