Etymon

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Etymon

 

a form or meaning from which a word in a modern language is derived. For example, the Russian verb vnushat’ (“to inspire”) is derived from two etymons: the preposition V ъ n (“in”) and the noun ukho (“ear”). Etymons are identified through scientific etymological research. The establishment of etymons plays an important role in the study of problems in such areas as ethnogeny, ancient substrata, the historical development of language, and relationships between languages.

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2] (7) of these etyma is identically /a/ in Northern Sami (in 3 out of 4 etyma) [i\e], Mari [a], Nenets [e], Enets [e], Mator [e], Beijing Yan [a], and Taipei Min [0], but identically /a/ in Finnic [a], Northern Sami (in 1 out of 4 etyma) [a], and Guangzhou Yue [e].
2] (8) of these etyma is fundamentally unchanged on the Finnic (Uralic) side, but merged with /n/ on the Sinitic side.
2] of these etyma is identically [a] in Finnic and Beijing Yan, but [o] in Guangzhou Yue and Taipei Min.
2] of these etyma is fundamentally unchanged on the Sinitic side, but changed to /j/ on the Finnic (Uralic) side.
Some actual etyma of the same root contain different fundamental tonemes, since different morphophonological affixes have been formerly added to the same root.
The rhyme correspondences are exemplified by ten Sino-Finnic (including Uralic) shared etyma.
If regular sound correspondences among the correlated lects are, in addition, established on the basis of a sufficient number of etyma, the etymologies are extremely reliable.
Tonemes are often identical in Sino-Finnic shared etyma.
Each toneme correspondence is exemplified by five etyma.
The shared etyma demonstrated in the rhyme correspondences enable two onset correspondences to be established as well (Tables 8, 9).
This set of etyma produced a conundrum for Emeneau.
Emeneau could find only seven etyma out of over 4,500 in the DED (Burrow and Emeneau 1961) that were uniquely shared by Brahui and Kurux-Malto; these will be updated and discussed in [section]3.