Etymon


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Etymon

 

a form or meaning from which a word in a modern language is derived. For example, the Russian verb vnushat’ (“to inspire”) is derived from two etymons: the preposition V ъ n (“in”) and the noun ukho (“ear”). Etymons are identified through scientific etymological research. The establishment of etymons plays an important role in the study of problems in such areas as ethnogeny, ancient substrata, the historical development of language, and relationships between languages.

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Cet etymon comporte bien une pharyngale /c/ et une labiale /b/, qui, eu egard au jeu des combinaisons de vecteurs de traits possibles, est la realisation de la structure matricielle:
The flaw in the case for an etymon <hine> lies chiefly in this matter of survival.
Ces vues permettent, si peu qu'on y souscrive, de refuter le postulat d'un etymon i.
Before 1600 only 6 borrowings are documented: namely galingale, japan, li (1), litchi, typhoon and Tangut; in 17th century: 31 items, followed by 44 tokens between 1700-1800; the next century, 1800-1900, shows 112, while in the last century 152 loanwords are displayed from 1900 to 1992, which shows the last year when a Chinese etymon was registered for the first time in the OED.
Bense seems to suppose a Flemish etymon *hanken (developed from haken?
The juxtaposition of Sankrit ksana-and Irish tan points straightforwardly (if perhaps unobvi-ously) to a reconstructable etymon *tKno-, *tKna-.
In fact, the replacement for the feminine comes from the French etymon dove by adding a French suffix (-ess).
While the general meaning of the term was fairly clearly outlined, its etymon was not identified in a satisfying way.
38) "Thus, I-E [p], [t], [k] > [f], [theta], [x] (Grimm's Law) or [b], [d], [g] (Verner's Law) depending on the position of the stress accent in the I-E etymon concerned.
The ethnonym Thai/Tai and its derived forms come from the Proto-Thai etymon [*daj.
Bohas's main assumptions regarding word formation in Semitic is that the lexicon consists of three levels: the matrix / template ([mu]), the etymon ([member of]), and the radical (R).
First, the PIE etymon, as written, is impossible, since the infixed nasal of the Proto-language would have been realized as dorsal, not labial before a root-final dorsal.