HIE

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Related to euglycemia: hypoglycemia, glycosylated hemoglobin, euglycemic, Hemoglobin A1c

HIE

(Health Information Exchange) A service that enables exchange of healthcare information between hospitals and regions. The information is not only used to provide medical data for people who move to a different geographic area, but also to provide statistics for public health in general. There are many regional health information organizations (RHIOs) throughout the U.S. that are involved in health information exchange (HIE), and the terms RHIO and HIE are used synonymously. See NHIN and healthcare IT.
References in periodicals archive ?
He has studied various aspects of diabetes-related birth defects from causation to treatment strategies aimed at achieving euglycemia during early pregnancy and--better yet--before pregnancy.
Wright and colleagues also determined that hyperinsulinemic euglycemia produced a significant decrease in von Willebrand factor from baseline in the diabetic group, indicating a vasculo protective effect.
In light of the above findings, it was the purpose of this study to measure the in vivo pilocarpine-induced sweat rate during hypoglycemia, euglycemia, and hyperglycemia.
Diabetic management during labor and delivery is aimed at maintaining maternal euglycemia to avoid neonatal hypoglycemia.
Diltiazem poisoning treated with hyperinsulinemic euglycemia therapy and intravenous lipid emulsion.
Achieving euglycemia without becoming hypoglycemic has been the challenge to most clinical research studies.
In non-diabetic subjects after carbohydrate ingestion, glucagon release is inhibited and the stimulation of insulin secretion establishes an equilibrium that maintains euglycemia.
lc] in nondiabetic patients indicate that even euglycemia and/or brief periods of hyperglycemia cause glycosylation of hemoglobin A and result in accumulation over time.
In this article we discuss data demonstrating an anti-inflammatory effect of insulin and a pro-inflammatory effect of glucose and free fatty acids and provide a mechanistic justification for the benefits of maintaining euglycemia with insulin infusions in the hospitalized patient.
The hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp was performed (0-120 min) by a continuous infusion of human insulin (3 mU/kg/min) (Actrapid, Novo Nordisk, Bagsvaerd, Denmark), and euglycemia (~ 115 mg/dL) was maintained by variable infusion rates of a 20% nonlabeled glucose solution [glucose infusion rate (GIR)].
Supplementation with chromium does not appear to reduce glucose levels in euglycemia.