candlefish

(redirected from eulachon)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to eulachon: Walleye Pollock

candlefish:

see smeltsmelt,
common name for a small, slender fish of the family Osmeridae. Most species are marine, but some ascend freshwater streams to spawn and others are landlocked in lakes. The rainbow or American smelt, Osmerus mordax, averages 10 in. (25 cm) in length and 1 lb (.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Both species share common prey species such as crangon shrimp, wall-eye pollock, saffron cod, Pacific sand lance, Pacific sandfish, surf smelt, eulachon, and Pacific herring (Quakenbush et al.
He also traded lumber for traditional commodities such as eulachon grease (March 1889).
Gifts might consist of foodstuffs, goat-hair blankets, canoes, and the prized grease from the eulachon.
Nature in its abundance will highlight the call at Haines as millions of eulachon (pronounced hooligan
The tighter spacing, ODFW reports, keeps out a small, threatened fish called eulachon.
4] microsatellites in geoduck or eulachon (data not shown) at RT.
Eulachon, Thaleichthys pacificus, and Chinook salmon were the only prey identified to species during this time period.
7) report occasionally catching eulachon (Thaleichthys pacificus) and redtail surfperch (Amphistichus rhodoterus), neither of which we have encountered.
Two years ago, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration listed the eulachon, or smelt, population off the California, Oregon and Washington coasts as threatened under the U.
From the few studies that have occurred in the upper inlet, Moulton (1997) found herring abundant during sampling periods in June, July, and September of 1993, with smelts such as longfin smelt, Spirinchus thaleichthys, and capelin, Mallotus villosus, in small numbers, and eulachon, Thaleichthys pacificus, very abundant but only in early June.
A 2010 study found the new spacing reduced the amount of eulachon caught in shrimp nets by 16 percent.
Starting in 1993, the numbers of eulachon (the Chinook name for smelt) went into a steep, seven-year dive, and a once-massive run shrank to a mere trickle.