eulogy

(redirected from eulogistic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to eulogistic: eulogise, eulogistic speech

eulogy

a formal speech or piece of writing praising a person or thing, esp a person who has recently died
References in periodicals archive ?
Caro's focus on the city reinstates a eulogistic theatrical tradition.
James' Collins delivers a powerful eulogistic reprise of ``I'll Cover You'' in the second act.
The author combines a history of British mountaineering with his own personal experiences described in a rather eulogistic manner.
Had it been published a century ago, it would be considered "normal" in its retelling (almost in a eulogistic fashion) of the struggles endured by settlers in the 1840s and in its Whiggish approach to history: despite the Anglo legislators' arrogant refusal to respect the rights of Californios and Native Americans, their naively unenforceable tax law, and their occasional myopia, the reader is reassured that "we" can be challenged by the example of those legislators' experiences to "search for new ways of dealing with old problems" (p.
It is an eulogistic museum which was recently successfully redesigned to appeal to a younger generation which was not around during JFK's lifetime.
Among the former are several poems by MacLeish, most of which are eulogistic in nature, and the most noted of which is a small elegy simply entitled "Hemingway.
Likewise, it is the eulogistic cast of the whole poem that creates a sympathetic context for, and lends credence to, the reactivation of "well" in "dwell" and gives it that celebrated, supplementary weight.
Whilst the Innamorato better fits the former category, the Furioso, with its eulogistic and satiric elements on the origins of the Este family, seems to exploit more persistently the features of teleologic magic.
10] See also James's use of 'improvisatrice' as a term of approbation to describe George Sand in two of his eulogistic pieces on her: 'Letter from Paris' (22 July 1876), and 'George Sand' (July 1877): 'People may like George Sand or not, but they can hardly deny that she is the great improvisatrice of literature -- the writer who best answers to Shelley's description of the skylark singing "in profuse strains of unpremeditated art".
Montgomery Hyde, a British intelligence operative during the conflict, wrote a eulogistic biography of his boss, Sir William Stephenson, the Canadian-born industrialist who ran British military operations in the Western Hemisphere (The Quiet Canadian, 1962; Amer.
His eulogistic, nationalist samba-exaltacao 'Aquarela do Brasil', Brazil's 'second national anthem', used tautological hyperbole and cliche to transform the baiana and mulata into icons of folklorized mestico nationalism for easy, uncritical consumption.