euripus


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euripus

1. In ancient Rome, any artificial pond or canal used to ornament a villa.
2. A ditch around the arena of an amphitheater of a circus to prevent wild animals from escaping.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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O euripus correndo pelo centro da pista era feito de tal maneira que poderia ser removido para competicoes de corrida, enquanto as baias dos carceres foram projetadas especialmente para corridas de cavalos e bigas.
294) observes: "in the High Empire, and possibly at the moment when the euripus was first built, certain monuments were converted into fountains."
The important design elements of the Medieval Moorish gardens which are seen in the later, Renaissance gardens, are: Fountains and the use of channeled running water, (euripus) and the merging of Architectural elements with the use of the Patio and Portico.
Operation Euripus was launched early yesterday and involved raids on 40 business premises and 31 residential premises.
The similarity lies in this: when a man without proper knowledge concerning arguments has confidence in the truth of an argument and afterwards thinks that it is false, whether it really is so or not, and this happens again and again; then you know, those men especially who have spent their time in disputation come to believe that they alone have discovered that there is nothing sound or sure ([GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) in anything, whether argument or anything else, but all things go up and down, like the tide in the Euripus, and nothing is stable for any length of time.
We may be surprised by this mythical account of Aristotle's reaction to the complicated currents of the Euripus in Greece, and assume that "other Mens Inquiries" have long since solved all the problems of tides in the world's oceans.