euryhaline


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euryhaline

[¦yu̇r·ə¦ha‚līn]
(ecology)
Pertaining to the ability of marine organisms to tolerate a wide range of saline conditions, and therefore a wide variation of osmotic pressure, in the environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Osmoregulation by gills of euryhaline crabs: molecular analysis of transporters.
This peculiarity contrasts with the habitat of the Laurentian and Gondwanan Groelandaspididae, which had probably been euryhaline (Janvier & Clement 2005).
1995), it appears that most studies in fish that have determined the acute effects of systemically administered ANGII on blood pressure have been performed in marine adapted or euryhaline fish.
The two designated units of critical habitat are the Charlotte Harbor Estuary Unit and the Ten Thousand Islands/ Everglades Unit, which share the two features that are essential to the conservation of the species: red mangrove shorelines and shallow, euryhaline waters (wide-ranging salinity) with depths of less than 3 feet at mean lower low water.
Reoccurrence of a commercial euryhaline fish species, Atherina boyeri Risso, 1810 (Atherinidae) in Buyukcekmece Reservoir (Istanbul, Turkey).
Callinectes exasperatus is a euryhaline crab that inhabits intertidal and shallow subtidal zones to dephts of about 8 m, including estuaries near river mouths and mangroves (Melo, 1996; Carvalho & Couto, 2011), as a deposit feeder or preying on other invertebrates (Carvalho & Couto, 2011).
McCormick, "Evidence for growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor I axis regulation of seawater acclimation in the euryhaline teleost Fundulus heteroclitus," General and Comparative Endocrinology, vol.
The black-chinned tilapia, Sarotherodon melanotheron, is a euryhaline teleost widely distributed in West African aquatic ecosystems, where it is regularly exposed to a wide range of salinity values.
In this portion of the main-stem Pecos, fish diversity has declined substantially, and assemblages contain only a few tolerant, euryhaline species (Cheek and Taylor, 2015).