event tree


Also found in: Acronyms.

event tree

[i′vent ‚trē]
(industrial engineering)
A graphical representation of the possible sequence of events that might occur following an event that initiates an accident.
References in periodicals archive ?
When considering the influence of the reliability of fire protection systems on different fire scenarios, the event tree method is employed to generate various fire scenarios according to the success or failure of these fire protection systems.
Analysis of the event tree showed that the probability of spontaneous collapses, which appear during mine works, is negligible (0.
Event tree and fault tree analyses are often used together because of their complementary structures.
Plotted on probability-loss graphs, these distributions give us a more complete picture of the risk associated with a given exposure than merely plotting the outcomes of individual event tree branches.
Fault and event trees are simplified models of systems which can yield valuable information on process logic.
Combining root cause analysis (RCA), analytic hierarchy process (AHP), and event tree analysis (ETA) in a loop is able to develop and prioritize prevention strategies and more specifically evaluate whether these strategies can successfully control fire accidents or specific installation is needed.
Basing on event tree data, selective extraction 2 demonstrates better results than selective extraction 1.
The event tree determines the probability of the efficiency of the transport system.
In the circle of those who assess risk, that mapping of events is known as the Event Tree.
The topics include the challenges of balancing safety and security in implantable medical devices, reducing emergency department crowding: evidence-based strategies, using event trees to inform the quantitative analysis of healthcare services, a health informatics approach to understanding the discharge process, evaluating mobile health applications security based on application permissions, and exploring the impact of information seeking behaviors of online health consumers in the Arab world.
In complex instances when these necessary and sufficient conditions are combined into single event trees, the probability of the outcome can be expressed mathematically as a function of the several originating conditions.
The first half of the book covers the principles of risk analysis, the techniques used to develop and update a reliability data base, the reliability of multi-component systems, Markov methods used to analyze the unavailability of systems with repairs, fault trees and event trees used in probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs), and failure modes of systems.