evolutionary force

evolutionary force

[‚ev·ə¦lü·shə‚ner·ē ′fȯrs]
(evolution)
Any factor that brings about changes in gene frequencies or chromosome frequencies in a population and is thus capable of causing evolutionary change.
References in periodicals archive ?
What is left is for humans to acknowledge the world as a bleak, unloving place, and yet muster up Love anyway--not by turning one to another, as Arnold's speaker suggests in "Dover Beach," but by drawing on some cosmic, unpurposive force of Love inexplicably available to combat evolutionary force. In contending for this force, Pfeiffer, unlike Blind, projects no future, only a necessary response to the present.
Instead, Nature was seen as an evolutionary force that led to endless cycles of alternate creation and destruction.
Interbreeding between species is proving to be a powerful evolutionary force, says Daniela Palmer, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Chicago.
the only evolutionary force. Only people's creativity can change the situation."
"So are we now 'free' from nature and the evolutionary force of natural selection?
"Antibiotics may be the most powerful evolutionary force seen on this planet in billions of years," according to microbiologist Stuart Levy.
In order to convincingly prove that the survival instinct, commonly regarded as the physiological basis of representing arts, became the major evolutionary force, the author of Ghosts of Theatre and Cinema in Brain reaches for the latest empirical and therapeutic theories of neurobiology and evolutionary psychology.
As these clumsy tetrapods slowly became more mobile and terrestrially comfortable, their efforts to move more efficiently became an evolutionary force. At first, amphibians were not using their legs so much for propulsion, but for holding fast to the ground so that their trunk muscles could lilt their bodies over their legs.
It is no small irony, then, that some kind evolutionary force blessed me with a shortcut to weight loss on Wednesday.
In particular, he shows how collective action can be an important evolutionary force through which organizations and populations can reshape their environments.
Phylogenetic reconstruction of the evolution of allorecognition behavior using molecular systematics in this study shows that allorecognition at the whole colony level for purposes of space competition is unlikely to have been the original evolutionary force selecting for a highly polymorphic recognition system in botryllid ascidians, and perhaps, other colonial protochordates as well.
Ehrenreich properly emphasizes the role of predator defense as an evolutionary force in the human past and rejects the notion that an aggressive instinct is the "wellspring of war," or that male biology had a commanding role.

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