evolutionary tree


Also found in: Medical.

evolutionary tree

[‚ev·ə¦lü·shə‚ner·ē ′trē]
(evolution)
A diagram that portrays the hypothesized genealogical ties and sequence of evolutionary relationships linking individual organisms, populations, or taxa. Also known as phylogenetic tree.
A diagram that depicts the evolutionary relationship of protein or nucleic acid sequences.
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, the evolutionary tree indicates a close relationship of F1 and F2 strains and between both HIV-1-CRF isolates, which is not observed in the skew-based tree.
In a macabre twist, the hominid evolutionary tree's most famous fossil star, Lucy, tumbled to her death from high up in a tree, a controversial new study suggests.
He said a tumour evolutionary tree was like a "snowflake or fingerprint", unique to each patient.
If this doesn't work I'll probably hang my hat up and do something He pointed out that a tumour evolutionary tree was like a "snowflake or fingerprint", unique to each patient.
Taking a different view of the supernatural, the series is written from the viewpoint of the so-called Second Species, an offshoot of the evolutionary tree of Mankind which developed into the creatures known as vampires.
NEW YORK -- A fragment of jawbone found in Ethiopia is the oldest known fossil from an evolutionary tree branch that eventually led to modern humans, scientists reported Wednesday.
In logological terms crashing biotype trigrams are lined up into word ladders and Eckler-style networks (73-17, 156), aiming to create as large an evolutionary tree as possible.
The evolutionary tree has a couple of new branches, which gives the scientists a dataset so that they can reconstruct what happened to Listeria on a genomic level during the evolutionary transition from a free living ancestor to a pathogen.
Yet we've constructed a mythology that places us at the very top of the evolutionary tree, supreme creation of a supreme being.
The oldest fossils of a previously unknown ancient leopard species are shaking the pantherine evolutionary tree, suggesting that big cats arose in Asia, not Africa, according to a new study.
"Discovery of this new species was a shock to us because prior to this, the fossil record suggested that the evolutionary tree of platypuses was a relatively linear one," Archer explained.
The research estimated that the evolutionary tree split that led to horses on one branch and donkeys on the other happened about 4 million years ago.