exanthema

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exanthema

[‚eg‚zan′thē·mə]
(medicine)
An eruption on the skin.
Any disease or fever accompanied by a skin eruption.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Penate et al., viral diseases (chickenpox, herpes zoster, and herpes simplex virus, followed by viral exanthem) were the most common infections for which consultations were sought, followed by fungal and parasitic diseases (5).
Once defervescence occurs, an erythematous morbilliform exanthem appears.
(5), (7) As the name implies, the rash resembles a viral exanthem and this, as well as other inflammatory conditions with a similar presentation, should be excluded.
It's self-limited, but children do tend to appear more toxic with AGEP than with some of the other exanthems, especially if they are young.
Typical of other childhood exanthems, the illness is worse in adults.
While the individual lesions can appear similar to other viral exanthems, classically, the lesions spare the trunk in Gianotti-Crosti syndrome.
Malaria is not associated with a rash like those seen in meningococcal septicemia, typhus, enteric fever, viral exanthems, and drug reactions.
There are two school of thoughts regarding the pathogenesis of this kind of rash, where one proposes the involvement of immune complex6 and the other mentions the absence of virus and the immune complex in the lesional skin.12 Scaling is the result of dryness and /or subsiding of the exanthem. This exfoliation is the same as seen in other types of viral exanthems.
While most exanthems are self-limiting, some are not, making it important to establish a specific diagnosis, according to Dr.
Features that suggest a viral origin include conjunctivitis, coryza, hoarseness, cough, diarrhea, exanthems, or enanthems.
Atypical varicella exanthems have been associated with childhood cutaneous injuries such as antecedent wasp stings,[29] and classic dermatomal zoster has been reported in adults after spinal surgery[30] and even after trivial external musculoskeletal trauma.[31]
Acrodynia may be misdiagnosed as measles, other viral exanthems, or Kawasaki disease.