exception


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exception

1. Law (formerly) a formal objection in the course of legal proceedings
2. Law a clause or term in a document that restricts the usual legal effect of the document
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

exception

An error condition that changes the normal flow of control in a program. An exception may be generated ("raised") by hardware or software. Hardware exceptions include reset, interrupt or a signal from a memory management unit. Exceptions may be generated by the arithmetic logic unit or floating-point unit for numerical errors such as divide by zero, overflow or underflow or instruction decoding errors such as privileged, reserved, trap or undefined instructions. Software exceptions are even more varied and the term could be applied to any kind of error checking which alters the normal behaviour of the program.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

exception

An error. See exception handling.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(3) Catch block rethrows exceptions: catch block handles an exception and rethrows the same or another exception(s).
To analyze this matter, the Court uses a statutory interpretation approach to determine whether the noncommercial tort exception applies to this case and cases of this nature.
Patti and I can quibble over the numbers, but the bottom line is this: the counsel for a public university is trying to defend a policy of "admission by exception" for students who take high-school classes taught from a Christian perspective.
The adoption of the recurring item exception, together with the holdings in Rev.
NOTE: The cap exception is retroactive to the beginning of 2006.
Instead, Roberts wrote that the federal government's "argument echoes the classic rejoinder of bureaucrats throughout history: If I make an exception for you, I'll have to make one for everybody, so no exceptions."
As a result, the relieving exception in proposed paragraph 56.4(3)(c) is not available (owing to the preamble of subsection 56.4(3)).
The motor vehicle exception to the Fourth Amendment, first recognized by the Supreme Court in Carroll v.
How does an "exception" differ from a "business decision?" An exception is either based on sound judgment or is an outright surrender.
We found problems with IRS's use of three types of exception reports.
The most common exception to employment-at will is for public policy.