excerpt


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excerpt

a part or passage taken from a book, speech, play, etc., and considered on its own; extract
References in periodicals archive ?
In a recent article, excerpted here from Bencivenga Bullets, "The two most powerful words in advertising and how to use them to explode your response fairly easily and consistently," we committed a disconcertingly common sin in both excerpting and copywriting (4/16/04).
"Conspiracy Theory" and Sound Argumentation: The Method of Cocaine Politics for resolving "Conflicting World Views" (excerpt) Jon Bouknight
Based solely on your evaluation of each annual report excerpt, how likely are you to buy stock in each company?
As various as the sources are the formats of the selections: short stories, poems, song lyrics, essays, excerpts from novels and autobiographies, cartoons, and simple, biting or wise "sayings." Each chapter contains pure folk materials; perhaps the richest part of each is its conclusion with a section of "Mama Sez" and "Sister to Sister." Regardless of format, the persistent theme is that African American women have been rankly abused, occasionally self-abusing, yet have always survived by "laughin' to keep from cryin'."
This collection of excerpts is taken from diaries written by women between 1830 and 1996.
Excerpt: Washington-Baltimore is likely to advance when the U.S.
The excerpts are drawn mainly from the CBSO's magnificent catalogue of commercial recordings, conducted here by Sakari Oramo, Sir Simon Rattle and Walter Weller.
The excerpt would have to be provided before a person would be able to take up a position, reported Aktuellt, a Finnish news programme.
The purpose of this research was to find a correlation between hemisphericity, or brain dominance, and sensory learning style, and the SAT excerpt math and verbal scores of gifted and talented high school students.
Nevertheless, I am glad to see that my book, or at least its excerpt, has struck a nerve.
This excerpt from Spinoff: A Personal History of the Industry That Changed the World (Saranac Lake Publishing, Saranac Lake, New York, 2001) recounts the story of the eight young men who in 1957 left the employ of William Shockley to found Fairchild Semiconductor and, with it, today's semiconductor industry.
It is the authors who have failed to select an excerpt from Morgan that adequately presents the issue, not that Lord Hailsham failed to discuss it adequately.