exchange transfusion


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exchange transfusion

[iks′chānj tranz‚fyü·zhən]
(medicine)
The replacement of most or all of the recipient's blood in small amounts at a time by blood from a donor, a technique used particularly in cases of erythroblastosis fetalis, in certain types of poisoning such as salicylism, and occasionally in liver failure. Also known as replacement transfusion.
References in periodicals archive ?
A) Before erythrocyte exchange transfusion. Parasitemia was 25%-30%.
This remains a controversial topic and there are no clear recommendations for or against prophylactic exchange transfusions in pregnancy.
Although jaundice at a level necessitating exchange transfusion did not develop in our patient, anti-E antibody was found as positive.
Telfer, "A comparison of chronic manual and automated red blood cell exchange transfusion in sickle cell disease patients," British journal of haematology, vol.
As predictors in the model we used OAE responses, sex, and risk factors that have been reported in the literature to cause hearing loss in the neonatal period, such as intake of ototoxic medications, birth weight, hyperbilirubinemia requiring exchange transfusions, and severe birth asphyxia.
As the hyperbilirubinemia increased and her Hgb dropped further she underwent an exchange transfusion. She tolerated this well.
Similarly, IVIG and exchange transfusion (ET) have been used to improve the outcome of SN.
Phototherapy was given to all neonates while exchange transfusion was performed in 5% who had total serum bilirubin [greater than or equal to] 20 mg/dl.
Changes in haematology and blood chemistry before and after exchange transfusion are shown in Table 3.
(5.) Akcakus, M., Esel, D., Cetin, N., Kisaarslan, A.P., Kurtoglu, S., Brucella melitensis in blood cultures of two newborns due to exchange transfusion. Turk J Pediatr, 2005; 47: 272-274.
A research done in National Institute of Child Health (NICH), Pakistan, reported incidence of kernicterus in hyperbilirubinaemic premature infants to be 2-16%.1 Of them, 75% or more of such infants died and 80% of affected survivors were reported to have bilateral choreoathetosis with involuntary muscle spasms, and other neurodevelopmental abnormalities, such as sensorineural hearing loss, hypotonia, tremors, ballismus, delayed motor skills, and rarely, intellectual deficit.1,8 Increased concentration of bilirubin in the brain requiring exchange transfusion along with early age of onset of hyperbilirubinaemia increasing the duration of exposure to bilirubin are important determinants of the neurotoxic effects of bilirubin.2,9