excoriation


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Related to excoriation: neurotic excoriation

excoriation

[ek‚skȯr·ē′ā·shən]
(medicine)
Abrasion of a portion of the skin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Depression (a) Indirect association via neurotic excoriation, trichotillomania, agitation, and sleep disturbances (b) Direct association with psoriasis with inflammatory mechanism 8.
William Sayers's fascinating contribution at Chapter 10 looks to Irish accounts of flaying across literary traditions, contrasting the excoriation of St Bartholomew with Irish legal texts, and the epic Destruction of Da Derga's Hostel.
Well, in fairness, it probably comes as some light relief after the usual excoriation over screwing up the last election and Brexit.
Tradipitant showed significant improvements in several clinical features of severity of atopic dermatitis, including excoriation, erythema, oozing and dryness.
Psychogenic excoriation responding to fluoxetine: a case report.
He called the book a work of"nonsensical history and execrable citizenship," which, he added mordantly,"should come with a warning: 'Caution you are about to enter a no-facts zone.'" An affronted O'Reilly summoned Will, a Fox News contributor at the time, for an on-air excoriation."You are not telling the truth!" he yelled."You are actively misleading the American people!
After applying the cream for 1–2 weeks, all of them experienced local skin reactions ranging from mild erythema, edema to severe reactions such as excoriation, erosion, ulceration, along with burning, pain, itching in the treated area [Table 1].
Excessive rubbing of nose and cleaning the nose repeatedly also causes erythema and excoriation of vestibular skin.
This is especially needed if complication like leak around the appliance, skin excoriation, prolapse and problems with its high output occurs6.
Excoriation is a disorder in which individuals repetitively scratch or pick their skin, resulting in visible tissue damage.
The complications of colostomy formation observed were skin excoriation (62%), stoma prolapse (23.4%), bleeding (haemorrhage) (12.5%), obstruction (stenosis) (4.68%), wound infection (9.37%), and retraction (6.25%).