executive privilege


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executive privilege,

exemption of the executive branch of government, or its officers, from having to give evidence, specifically, in U.S. law, the exemption of the president from disclosing information to congressional inquiries or the judiciary. Claims of executive privilege are usually invoked to protect confidential military or diplomatic operations or to protect the private discussions and debates of the president with close aides. Efforts by various presidents since Eisenhower to gain absolute and unqualified privilege have been rejected by the courts, though they remain inclined to support most claims of executive privilege. Where criminal charges are being brought against a president, as in the case of Richard Nixon, the claims of executive privilege are weakest; during the process leading to the impeachment of President Bill Clinton, numerous claims made by the White House were dropped when it was clear courts would not uphold them.
References in periodicals archive ?
faith ask the question (if an executive privilege claim is raised)
The Bush administration had previously claimed that aides were shielded from testifying by executive privilege, sparking a lawsuit from the judiciary committee.
"And the order also requires the Attorney General and the White House Counsel to review claims of executive privilege about covered records to make sure those claims are fully warranted by the Constitution."
"Executive Privilege" is a bombshell and come June, the author can rest assured that he has another bestseller in his hands.
In the meantime, the ruling provided the framework for executive privilege, which the Bush administration has been trying to expand.
Time line was--no more than a couple years ago, actually--when CEOs passionate about golf exercised their executive privilege each spring by making pilgrimages to Scotland or Ireland and playing historic links such as St.
Although well established now as a legitimate presidential power, executive privilege remains controversial.
The Order shifts the burden of proof from the President to the person requesting information; extends the fight to exert executive privilege to the Vice President, a former vice president, or a designated representative; contradicts regulations issued by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); and indefinitely seals records from the public.
Some Democrats have been pushing the committee to subpoena Lewandowski in order to avoid an executive privilege clash with the White House, as he is the only star witness in Mueller report who has no formal role in the White House.
The Justice and Commerce departments have produced more than 31,000 pages of documents to the House regarding the census issue, and senior officials from both agencies, including Ross, have spoken on the record about the matter, the White House said, adding that Democrats continue to demand documents that the White House contends are subject to executive privilege.
Democratic politicians stated that White House lawyers did not claim executive privilege but argued that Hicks was immune from having to testify, which they called a "bogus" position that does not exist in law.

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