exhaust velocity


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exhaust velocity

[ig′zȯst və′läs·əd·ē]
(fluid mechanics)
The velocity of gaseous or other particles in the exhaust stream of the nozzle of a reaction engine, relative to the nozzle.
References in periodicals archive ?
s], at constant exhaust velocity, u, and soot concentration, [[rho].
Apart from the runner length, runner volume, collector, back pressure and exhaust pulse, the physical shape of the manifold also has significant impact on exhaust velocity.
If jet exhaust velocity is greater than the local speed of sound, very high levels of broadband shock-associated noise and screech tones can be generated.
An NTR uses nuclear fission as an energy source instead of chemical combustion, and uses just hydrogen as a propellant, allowing it to achieve a very high exhaust velocity and high thrust, Discovery News reported.
N] derives from the fact that it remains relatively constant for a variety of full-scale atmospheric conditions and varying ratio of exhaust velocity to wind speed.
There is thus almost no limit to the theoretical exhaust velocity of such technology and, in fact, exhaust velocities of 50,000 to 100,000 m/s--10 to 20 times those of chemical engines--have been demonstrated.
Hence, in our early study, a range hood was proposed to switch its exhaust velocity to a proper level according to the detection of cooking fumes completed by a sensitive piezoelectric transducer in order to reduce the running noise (Liu and Young 2002).
To explore the outer planets in a reasonable time, engines must generate either high exhaust velocity or high specific impulse.
This is important from a safety standpoint because user safety could be compromised due to insufficient exhaust velocity.
The difference in minimum self-reentrainment dilution ratios can be attributed to the difference in exhaust velocity and exhaust louver design in the two installations.
According to Beattie, the Hughes xenon-ion propulsion system (XIPS) provides nearly 10 times greater exhaust velocity than current bipropellant (monomethyl hydrazine /nitrogen tetroxide) chemical thrusters, which, he said, essentially allows Hughes' designers to trade 10 pounds of chemical fuel for 1 lb of the xenon propellant.