exocrine gland

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Related to Exocrine glands: Endocrine glands, Exocrine system

exocrine gland

(ĕk`səkrən): see glandgland,
organ that manufactures chemical substances. A gland may vary from a single cell to a complex system of tubes that unite and open onto a surface through a duct. The endocrine glands, e.g.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Exocrine Gland

 

in animals and humans, a gland that secretes the substances it forms through ducts onto the surface of the body or of mucous membranes or into a cavity. Exocrine glands include the sebaceous, salivary, sweat, mammary, lacrimal, and musk glands, as well as the liver, glands of the gastrointestinal tract, and other glands that release secretions into the alimentary canal.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

exocrine gland

[′ek·sə·krən ‚gland]
(physiology)
A structure whose secretion is passed directly or by ducts to its exterior surface, or to another surface which is continuous with the external surface of the gland.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

exocrine gland

Med any gland, such as a salivary or sweat gland, that secretes its products through a duct onto an epithelial surface
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Medications stimulating the exocrine glands are administered when the salivary glands are only partially impaired [13].
(1,3,4) The recurring nature of this disease, combined with the diversity of possible sites of involvement, can mean multiple resections and potential loss of exocrine gland function.
Gibbins, "Target-related patterns of co-existence of neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal peptide, enkephalin and substance P in cranial parasympathetic neurons innervating the facial skin and exocrine glands of guinea-pigs," Neuroscience, vol.38, no.2, pp.541-560,1990.
Also called Sjogren's syndrome, this is a chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease characterised by lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands, leading to diminished glandular secretion.
Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a disease which affects not only the pancreas but also exocrine glands throughout the entire body that secrete digestive fluids and mucus, including the airways and the intestine.
Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disorder of the exocrine glands with associated lymphocytic infiltrates of the affected glands.
& BILLEN J., 2006.- Coevolved crypts and exocrine glands support mutualistic bacteria in fungus-growing ants.
The ectoderm first differentiates the brain and nervous system tissue, then forms the endoderm, which produces the internal mucous membranes and a number of endocrine glands (such as the thyroid and the thymus) and exocrine glands (such as the pancreas).
Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a disorder of the exocrine glands, and it causes the glands to produce abnormally thick secretions and mucus.
He described a pair of exocrine glands embedded in the subepithelial connective tissue of the ventro-lateral peristomium under the fold of the collar in Ficopomatus enigmaticus (Fauvel, 1923) (as Mercierella).
In the case of exocrine glands, cells secrete their products into ducts which carry secretions to a free surface (either internal or external).
Recently, an ultrastructural study on exocrine glands of Cyphophthalmus duricorius (Cyphophthalmi) was published (Gutjahr et al.