exotic

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exotic

[ig′zäd·ik]
(ecology)
Not endemic to an area.
References in periodicals archive ?
The exoticness typical of Pakistan is reflected on the lines of the narration from the very beginning:
This generality is a weakness, as is the depiction of Venus and her family residing in a kind of timeless exoticness, apart from their community.
The Ratha Yatra Festival of Chariots, attended by an estimated 6,000 people, involved a special festival which aimed to incorporate all the exoticness, vitality and colour of India.
The 13th anniversary of this city festival promises to be a spectacular event with a procession and celebrations incorporating all the exoticness, vitality and colour that is India.
The portrayal of the eroticism of the Gypsy women is not favourable, because it associates this ethnic group with exoticness, which reflects the colonialist view deeply rooted in the Spanish mentality.
The advertisement focused on the exoticness of the film: "A subject which you have never come across, together with fantastic Oriental music and amazing scenes.
For myself, and in parallel to my own experience of researching Irish Catholic missionaries, they include the visual and sensual impact of the missions, the sheer exoticness of a different climate, topography, diet and language; the culture shock that became more pronounced returning to Ireland, as "home" changed places; the tension between becoming "as one" with the host population versus remaining "other" to it; the extent to which the missionary experience was never a one-way relationship but always an exchange between the missionary and the recipient, between the missionary endeavour and the host nation.
Drake defined black women as "exotic," which may play a role in increasing or exciting his attraction level to black women, with black women's buttocks being the height of that perceived exoticness.
Rather than masking it, Katie, with some prodding by her older sister, flaunts her "East meets South" exoticness and begins to charge community members money to watch and hear her speak.
For example, COO may associate a product with patriotism, national identity, pride, status, authenticity, exoticness, or other attributes of selfexpression or image (Botschen and Hemettsberger, 1998; Verlegh and Steenkamp, 1999).
Louis, the exoticness brought by the whispers of the fishermen, the smell of the marsh at low tide, and the shrimp boats with nets swaying in the breeze transcends the childlike enthusiasm that anglers feel when on the cusp of another great adventure.
Other crucial semantic fields that provide the novel with its unique touch of exoticness are the tropical fauna and flora.