exotic

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exotic

[ig′zäd·ik]
(ecology)
Not endemic to an area.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
At an open window of a room in the second story, hanging over some pots of beautiful and delicate flowers,--exotics, but which had never known a more genial sunshine than that of the New England autumn, --was the figure of a young lady, an exotic, like the flowers, and beautiful and delicate as they.
What once was a large garden was now all grown over with weeds, through which, here and there, some solitary exotic reared its forsaken head.
At night she often looked very attractive, she put on a gown which was almost a dinner dress, and she wore a chain of garnets round her neck; the lace about her bosom and at her elbows gave her a pleasant softness, and the scent she wore (at Blackstable no one used anything but Eau de Cologne, and that only on Sundays or when suffering from a sick headache) was troubling and exotic. She really looked very young then.
There was nothing very inviting in the object, but Mr Nickleby was wrapt in a brown study, and sat contemplating it with far greater attention than, in a more conscious mood, he would have deigned to bestow upon the rarest exotic. At length, his eyes wandered to a little dirty window on the left, through which the face of the clerk was dimly visible; that worthy chancing to look up, he beckoned him to attend.
Many exotic plants have pollen utterly worthless, in the same exact condition as in the most sterile hybrids.
As a result of severe fragmentation and periodic disturbance events, remnant prairies are likely susceptible to high levels of biological invasion from exotics with the potential for loss of native diversity (D'Antonio and Vitousek, 1992; Van Auken, 2000).
The animal welfare charity believes the reason behind some of the suffering of these exotics pets is that owners do not research their needs using expert sources and do not understand the type and amount of care that they need, resulting in them escaping, being abandoned or neglected.
The RSPCA believes the reason behind some of the suffering of these exotics pets is that owners do not do their research and don't understand the type and amount of care that they need, resulting in them being neglected, dumped or escaping.
Great news for all you bird and snake lovers out there: Lake Villa will officially be getting their very first Exotics Veterinarian this May.
Stephanie Jayson, RSPCA's senior scientific officer in exotics and a qualified exotics vet, said: "Although their numbers are small compared to more common pets, we have real concerns about the welfare of reptiles and other exotic animals kept as pets in this country.
Vet Stephanie Jayson, the RSPCA's senior scientific officer in exotics, said: "Exotic pets are completely reliant on their owners to meet their welfare needs.
Vet Stephanie Jayson, the RSPCA's senior scientific officer in exotics, said: "Reptiles and other exotic pets are completely reliant on their owners to meet their welfare needs including requiring the correct levels of heat, light and humidity, plus an appropriate diet.