expander

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expander

[ik′spand·ər]
(electronics)
A transducer that, for a given input amplitude range, produces a larger output range.
References in periodicals archive ?
The final step in the study is for offices that utilized expanded function assistants.
The challenge is to expand the portal to meet these needs in an effective and efficient manner.
In response to higher prices, world oil production outside OPEC expanded, thus loosening OPEC's grip on prices.
Energy remains a vital economic ingredient for the United States and other industrial democracies, and economic growth and prosperity will require expanded supplies of energy including oil and gas.
Such a process would help the students learn how to use this information to expand their education and career aspirations.
The new initiative, the Health Insurance Flexibility and Accountability (HIFA) Demonstration program, is designed to give states more options to expand coverage to low-income individuals and families.
VS&A Communications Partners II acquired CWA in 1997 and has since expanded the company through eight acquisitions.
While congressional committee reports and legislative language clearly indicate the new law does not fully eliminate restrictive prior legislation or judicial precedent, the good news is the law expands the definition of a principal place of business and allows a taxpayer who meets either the old or new standard to take a deduction.
If the IRS continues to take the position that investigatory and start-up costs to expand an existing business are not deductible, it could effectively nullify Sec.
Second, the paper will reemphasize that currently, the demand-side approach to job development meets the needs of the present-day employer and business world and allows rehabilitation counselors to horizontally expand their role within industry.
The IPE provisions in the 1998 Amendments expand upon the role of the eligible individual as a collaborating partner in the development, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of his or her own plan.
Even as the Supreme Court retreated from the activism of the 1960s, the lower courts decided dozens of cases that continued to expand welfare programs and procedures.