expansion


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

expansion,

in physics, increase in volume resulting from an increase in temperature. Contraction is the reverse process. When heat is applied to a body, the rate of vibration and the distances between the molecules composing it are increased and, hence, the space occupied by the body, i.e., its volume, increases. This increase in volume is not constant for all substances for any given rise in temperature, but is a specific property of each kind of matter. For example, zinc and lead undergo greater expansion in a one-degree rise in temperature than do silver or brass. Since solidssolid,
one of the three commonly recognized states in which matter occurs, i.e., that state, as distinguished from liquid and gas, in which a substance has both a definite shape and a definite volume.
..... Click the link for more information.
 have a definite shape, each linear dimension of the solid increases by a proportional amount for a given temperature increase. The amount that a unit length along any direction of a substance increases for a temperature increase of one degree is called the coefficient of linear expansion of the substance. Most liquids also expand when heated. However, since liquids do not have a definite shape, it is the expansion of their volume as a whole that is relevant rather than the increase in a linear dimension. The amount of expansion that a unit volume (e.g., a cubic centimeter or a cubic foot) of any substance undergoes per one-degree rise in temperature is called its volume coefficient or coefficient of cubical expansion and is listed as a property of that substance. The coefficient of linear expansion can be calculated by dividing the coefficient of cubical expansion of the substance by three. When the amount of expansion of a given length of a substance has been determined experimentally, the linear coefficient is calculated by dividing the total amount of expansion by the product of the original number of length units and the number of degrees of rise in temperature. Gases also exhibit thermal expansion. The coefficient of expansion is about the same for all the common gases at ordinary temperatures; it is 1-273 of the volume at 0°C; per degree rise in temperature. The Kelvin, or absolute, scale is based upon this behavior (see Kelvin temperature scaleKelvin temperature scale,
a temperature scale having an absolute zero below which temperatures do not exist. Absolute zero, or 0°K;, is the temperature at which molecular energy is a minimum, and it corresponds to a temperature of −273.
..... Click the link for more information.
). Charles's law concerning the expansion of gases states that the volume of a gas is directly proportional to its absolute temperature (see gas lawsgas laws,
physical laws describing the behavior of a gas under various conditions of pressure, volume, and temperature. Experimental results indicate that all real gases behave in approximately the same manner, having their volume reduced by about the same proportion of the
..... Click the link for more information.
). Liquids differ from each other as do solids in their expansion coefficients. Water, unlike most substances, contracts rather than expands as its temperature is increased from 0°C; to 4°C;; above 4°C; it exhibits normal behavior, expanding as the temperature increases.

expansion

[ik′span·shən]
(electronics)
A process in which the effective gain of an amplifier is varied as a function of signal magnitude, the effective gain being greater for large signals than for small signals; the result is greater volume range in an audio amplifier and greater contrast range in facsimile.
(mathematics)
The expression of a quantity as the sum of a finite or infinite series of terms, as a finite or infinite product of factors, or, in general, in any extended form.
(mechanical engineering)
Increase in volume of working material with accompanying drop in pressure of a gaseous or vapor fluid, as in an internal combustion engine or steam engine cylinder.
(physics)
Process in which the volume of a constant mass of a substance increases.

expansion

The increase in length or volume of a material, or a body, caused by temperature, moisture, or other environmental condition.

expansion

1. Maths
a. the form of an expression or function when it is written as the sum or product of its terms
b. the act or process of determining this expanded form
2. the part of an engine cycle in which the working fluid does useful work by increasing in volume
3. Physics the increase in the dimensions of a body or substance when subjected to an increase in temperature, internal pressure, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a multivariate analysis, only transversal expansion (adjusted odds ratio 2.0) and macrosomic fetus (more than 4,000 g: adjusted OR 10.6) were significantly associated with unintended expansion of the incision.
The influence of three main factors--mesh size, silica content and shape--on expansion was investigated.
The commission is seeking to attract even non-aviation-related businesses as part of their industrial expansion project.
Expansion. Part of the debate revolves around the need for expansion at all.
Expansion and market penetration is the name of the game.
The Polar Express cross-promotion and Santa Contest were just two of the elements of the 2004 Market Expansion Campaign that Drake & Company and Smith & Harroff created for NCTA.
In development is a complete family of add-on peripherals for the popular PCI-X expansion bus.
If the secular recovery supports an historically long business cycle expansion, we could very well see stock prices rise the same degree they did during the Izanagi Keiki, similar to the US in the 80s.
The five-year requirement is relaxed if a business undergoes expansion or changes (i.e., adds or drops products, changes production capacity, etc.) in a way not equivalent to acquiring a new or different business.
BETWEEN THE LINES: This political maneuver, aiming to purchase votes with the largest entitlement expansion in four decades, should dissolve any belief in GOP fiscal responsibility.
Asked if the expansion represented both a horizontal and vertical expansion--horizontal into the law and business areas but vertical by staying the health and medical industries, Henderson told NL/NL, "You are correct in that there is a relationship between our expansion into law and business and our history in biotech, pharmaceuticals, and healthcare.