expansion coefficient


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expansion coefficient

[ik′span·shən kō·ə′fish·ənt]

coefficient of expansion

The change in dimension of a material per unit of dimension per degree change in temperature.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, at a given temperature, the thermal expansion coefficient of LDPE is slightly higher than that of HDPE while the compressibility of the polymers are almost identical, indicating that the responses of the materials to temperature and pressure are different.
Equation 9 is essentially the reverse of the initial thermal expansion process and will tend to cancel out errors in the modulus/temperature and expansion coefficient data.
When natural zeolite was added to epoxy resin, the residual stress was concentrated on the interface because of the differences of elastic modulus and thermal expansion coefficient and the shrinkage of the epoxy matrix, so the tensile strength and impact strength decreased.
This shows that the value of the thermal expansion coefficient of AlN-filled EMC is lower than that of crystalline silica-filled EMC when added in equal volume.
This leads to moisture-induced stresses which are considerably higher compared to the former yet agree well with those calculated by experimental moisture expansion coefficients.
However, it is known that zinc oxide formed according to reactions (6 and 7) is the necessary component of easily melted glaze, since it and promotes decreasing the thermal expansion coefficient and can act as a flux.
It is possible to perform numerical integration in order to calculate the expansion coefficients [([a.
Similarly, the results, in terms of the maximum values of the equivalent stress in each phase, obtained by varying the Young modulus and the linear thermal expansion coefficient, are shown in Figure 4.
The value of thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) was gradually decreased from 8.
Thermal expansion coefficient value (a) of glass waste was determined by dilatometry measurements.
In combination with a base plate made of aluminum-silicon carbide with a low expansion coefficient and high thermal conductivity, it guarantees low conduction and switching losses and thus high energy efficiency combined with robustness, according to the company.
All these alternatives may fail early on, before metal clasps do, due to chipping and fracture caused by flexibility differences and the elasticity modulus, lower retentive forces and the thermal expansion coefficient between the material and the RDP metal used.