expansion coefficient


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expansion coefficient

[ik′span·shən kō·ə′fish·ənt]

coefficient of expansion

The change in dimension of a material per unit of dimension per degree change in temperature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other specialized apparatus was used for auxiliary measurements: i) an oven/cooler for measurements of the thermal expansion coefficient, ii) capacitance measurements between the piston and cylinder for estimates of the crevice width, and iii) ultrasound for measurements of Young's modulus of the piston and cylinder.
The linear expansion coefficient of GaAs is 6.4 x [10.sup.-6] [K.sup.-1], which is larger than that of Si, resulting in the shrinkage of GaAs being bigger than that of Si during the cooling process and the bonding structure protruding upwards.
Te thermal expansion coefficient of a material is a measure of the rate of change in volume and therefore density with temperature.
According to obtained results, GF frit has a higher thermal expansion coefficient (100.5) than S1B frit (64.86).
Thermal expansion coefficient for Polypropylene (Blend and Virgin).
For a TBC with lower thermal expansion coefficient, it is better to have a lower elastic modulus for a durable coating [20],
Our numerical results for the thermal expansion coefficient and the heat capacity at constant pressure, the Young modulus, the bulk modulus, the rigidity modulus and the elastic constants of alloy FeC are summarized in tables from Tables 2-5 and are described by figures from
Okaji, "Linear thermal expansion coefficient of silicon from 293 to 1000 K," International Journal of Thermophysics, vol.
where [epsilon] is the volume strain, [T.sub.0] is the initial temperature, T - [T.sub.0] is the change in temperature, [[beta].sub.b] is the volume thermal expansion coefficient of solid skeleton, [P.sub.e] is the effective pressure, and [K.sub.d] is the bulk modulus of drainage.
which determines the m-th expansion coefficient, when [epsilon] exhibits uncertainty.