expert witness


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expert witness

A witness in a court case or other legal proceeding, or in an arbitration proceeding, who, by virtue of his experience, training, skill, and knowledge of a particular field or subject, is recognized as being especially qualified to render an informed opinion on matters relating to that field or subject.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many cases rise or fall on the testimony of expert witnesses. That can complicate a case considerably and make an ordinary juror's job even harder.
In this live webcast, the Knowledge Group brought together a team of distinguished thought leaders and professionals to help the audience understand the framework of expert witness testimony in an IP litigation dispute.
The overriding duty of an expert witness is to the court.
The expert witness admitted that his last visit took place in the '70s, before cellular phones were in use, thereby rendering him unable to give "on-the-ground" testimony on Lebanese cellular networks.
Doar's acquisition of ESG provides the company with a team of industry veterans who understand the value that expert witnesses bring to the litigation process and who know how to identify and qualify experts for various types of cases.
Appraisers should only be in a courtroom if they're paid to be there as consultants or expert witnesses. Unfortunately, some appraisers have discovered that their expert testimony can quickly transform them from expert to defendant.
Relevant work experience, including prior testimonies and publications, is another important factor to consider when evaluating an expert witness's qualifications.
One section of the bill amends the expert witness portion of F.
But if you will say anything to make the client happy, you may find that your career as an expert witness will be over before it has barely begun.
Tina York, an attorney for Christus Santa Rosa, said it is unusual for a case to get dismissed because of problems with an expert witness report.
The court held, inter alia, that it agreed with Barbara's contention that the Superior Court erred in granting JCL's motion for summary judgment when she did not have a "retained testifying medical expert," because "no expert witness is required for an intentional tort, including battery." The court went on to note that the Supreme Court of Arizona has explained: Claims involving lack of consent, i.e., the doctor's failure to operate within the limits of the patient's consent, may be brought as battery actions.
For that reason, consider not only what an opponent's expert witness is paid, but also how the expert is paid.

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