expiratory reserve volume

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expiratory reserve volume

[ek′spī·rə‚tȯr·ē ri¦zərv ‚väl·yəm]
(physiology)
At the end of a normal expiration, the quantity of air that can be expelled by forcible expiration.
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All participants were examined for instantaneous flow and expiratory and inspiratory flow rates both at large and small lung volumes.
KEY WORDS: Forced Expiratory Flow at 25-75%, Forced Expiratory Flow at 75% of FVC, Peak Expiratory Flow, Maximal Voluntary Ventilation
The means height, weight, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, force vital capacity and peak expiratory flow rate were 137.
For example, a lifelong smoker with an abnormal spirometry reading may have a forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of less than 80 percent of predicted.
This is a cross-sectional study done at a tertiary care hospital to compare the peak expiratory flow rate with the help of "Mini-Wright" peak flow meter among females, normal healthy subjects and subjects who are asthmatics of age group 20-40 years.
Often reported benefits are: Increased inspiratory muscle strength Reduced breathlessness Increased exercise performance Improved quality of life OPEP: Designed to interrupt the expiratory airflow, which results in the airways vibrating and thus loosening mucus.
In a sense, effective use of high frequency ventilation depends on it--as may Airway Pressure Release Ventilation (APRV) when external PEEP is set to zero, as advocated by some physicians to allow efficient expiratory flow across the valve.
Abdominal muscle stimulation induced large expiratory volumes, and upper-chest stimulation induced large inspiratory volumes.
Respiratory muscle training includes both inspiratory muscle training (IMT) and expiratory muscle training (EMT).
The most common spirometry measurements tested include forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/FVC ratio before and after the child is administered a short-acting beta2-agonist (SABA), and forced mid-expiratory flow (FEF25-75) (Chang, 2011; NAEPP, 2007).
Those with asthma who had a percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) under 80% had significantly greater levels of plasma CTGF compared to patients with a percentage of predicted FEV1 of 80% or greater.