explicit

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explicit

1
Maths (of a function) having an equation of the form y=f(x), in which y is expressed directly in terms of x, as in y = x4 + x + z FORMULA

explicit

2
the end; an indication, used esp by medieval scribes, of the end of a book, part of a manuscript, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The TRA announced on its official Twitter account on Thursday: "In order to protect the subscribers from excessive charges of the service "Pay-per-use data", TRA instructed the operators (@dutweets and @etisalat ) to discontinue this service unless the subscriber explicitly requests it from the operator."
The researchers found that 0.11 percent of 1.735 million reported safety events explicitly mentioned an EHR vendor or product and were reported as possible patient harm.
The American Psychological Association's (APA) Commission on Accreditation accredits several explicitly Christian psychology doctoral programs that are housed within distinctively Christian institutions.
BEIRUT: The National Audio-Visual Council slammed television stations Wednesday for explicitly expressing political stances in their news bulletins.
In 2004 the two of us co-edited a special issue of The Journal of Psychology and Christianity focused on research training in explicitly Christian doctoral programs in clinical psychology (McMinn & Hill, 2004).
sexual orientation, and explicitly out strategies involve being explicit
It says: "This reluctance explicitly to discriminate in favour of students from disadvantaged backgrounds is in contrast to the most prestigious American universities, which recognise that making increasingly fine distinctions on academic grounds between extremely able applicants is unlikely to be fruitful, and so explicitly seek to achieve as socially balanced an intake is possible, while maintaining academic standards."
While none of the modern theories of intelligence reviewed here explicitly argue that intelligence is strictly inherited, the author explicitly argues here that intelligence is dynamic, and can improve through education.
This practice was not explicitly prohibited until now, but was not explicitly authorised either.
That Jesus explicitly has us today in mind is suggested by his comment "If you know these things, you are blessed if you do them" (13:17).