explosive limits

explosive limits

[ik′splō·siv ′lim·əts]
(chemical engineering)
The upper and lower limits of percentage composition of a combustible gas mixed with other gases or air within which the mixture explodes when ignited.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thirdly, although hydrogen has flammability limits of 4-75%, its explosive limits are different at 17-56%, and its very low vapour density means it will tend to dissipate harmlessly into the atmosphere (look at hydrogen vehicle fires online and see how well they compare to petrol!).
To create a basis of comparison between calculated evaporation behavior and the theoretical and engine specific explosive limits, the equivalence ratio of air to gaseous fuel ([lambda].sub.gaseous) is chosen.
where L, U are the explosive limits of the gas mixture under atmospheric gas pressure.
TSgt Long authored the first CAPA Explosive Site Plan using NATO criteria, ensuring all pads and sited locations allow the maximum storage of munitions per Army regulatory guidance--personally placarding explosive limits ensuring first responders were aware of the explosive hazards present.
BI Chemicals needed a design to keep electrical energy at the instruments below the explosive limits of the area.
Explosive limits range from 1.1-4.3 percent lower to 16-46 percent upper--the lower number corresponding to the higher molecular weight, in both cases.
The twin-turbo V8 churns out an amazing 370bhp and Paul reckons the car is like a hand grenade with the pin out when it is pushed to its explosive limits.
If combustible gases are present, the addition of oxygen may bring gases to a level between their lower and upper explosive limits. Also, increasing the oxygen level above 21 percent will increase the combustibility of many substances, causing them to burn violently.
(*1) Oxygen concentration, [is greater than or equal to] 19.5%; concentration of flammable substances, [is less than] 10% of their respective lower explosive limits (i.e., the lowest concentration at which explosive combustion can occur); and toxic air contaminants, less than the concentration levels referenced in 29 CFR [section] 1910.1000, subpart Z [5].
With its suite of sensors, the Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Unmanned Ground Vehicle (CUGV) robot can collect chemical air samples and detect oxygen levels, explosive limits, volatile organic compounds, gamma radiation, toxic industrial chemicals, and chemical warfare agents.
Validated explosive limits on 26 facilities; identified/corrected six discrepancies.
Flammable gas-air mixtures are generally reasonably easy to prepare and to determine their lower and upper explosive limits. A greater challenge lies in situations where flammable gases are generated, such as in fires.

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