exponential curve


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Related to exponential curve: logarithmic curve

exponential curve

[‚ek·spə′nen·chəl ′kərv]
(mathematics)
A graph of the function y = a x , where a is a positive constant.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the first 50 to 75 cases, the learning curve stabilized and became a predictable negative exponential curve, suggesting that the surgical outcome improved at a constant rate and did not rapidly reach a plateau.
Simple growth phenomena in which the rate of increase is proportional to the size already achieved can be described by an exponential curve.
Modified Exponential Curve: The form of the modified exponential curve is
As will be discussed later, this type of AE damage agrees with the exponential curve of the crack density with the strain for some composites.
The time constant, which represents that point on the exponential curve that is 37% of maximum, occurs at 16.
While the stories always accounted for the increasing or decreasing aspects of the graph, they did not take into account other mathematically observable features, such as the rapid acceleration of an exponential curve.
With such an exponential curve, how can anyone expect to learn it all and cope with its ramifications?
In other words, we suppose that the exponential curve really exists, if 0.
The fit was not perfect, with the exponential curve overestimating the early part of drying.
The pace of technological development in this area is following an exponential curve.
Figure 4 plots the reported case counts in China, together with an exponential curve fitted to a smooth version of the counts (to allow for the discreteness in reports in early April).
Financial markets long ago established a norm for how this discounting should take place--the loss of a constant proportion of remaining value per unit of time, or exponential curve, which is the only function that will not lead to changes of relative valuation among goods at different delays as time passes.