exponential equation


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exponential equation

[‚ek·spə′nen·chəl i′kwā·zhən]
(mathematics)
An equation containing e x (the Naperian base raised to a power) as a term.
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For the exponential equation, the relative differences were 28.25, 9.16 and 7.14% for the same propellers, respectively.
(In order to find the number that would die using the discrete form of the exponential equation, the rate, r, is multiplied by the survival function times the number of assets in year zero.
The single (2), double (3), or triple (4) exponential equations have been widely used in recent research that fitted the experimental decay curves and may correspond to one, two, or three trap centers in the assumed model.
Solving (7) produces a possible relationship between QoE and QoS as an exponential equation form, as:
Recognising the relationship that results from the composition of inverse functions leads to understanding the logarithmic function as a key tool for solving exponential equations.
Besides, results obtained by the model regression equation very well coincide (determination coefficient variation threshold [R.sup.2] = 0.95-0.99) with exponential equations of the mentioned theoretical studies.
The calculated correlation factor confirmed that the change in the compressive strength of concrete obtained from exponential equations shown in Fig.
Also, the experimental data can be reasonably well described by the following exponential equation.
aspersa raised on lettuce in petri dishes in the laboratory, weight can initially be approximated by an exponential equation. The value of k found here during exponential growth of these snails is 15% less than that found for snails cultured over a 6-week period at an average temperature of 25 [degrees]C (Garcia et al., 2006) and is 26% greater than a k value found in other work by fitting a logistic equation to growth data ((Czarnolcgkiet al., 2008).
and the solution (2.11) is called an areolar exponential equation of the Fempl type [4].
The parameters for the USLE were fitted by two methods: (i) fitting an exponential equation to the soil loss--cover data (combining Eqns 2 and 4), and (ii) optimising the parameters K and bcov to minimise the sum of squares of errors (SSE) for measured and modelled average annual soil losses.