exponential law


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exponential law

[‚ek·spə′nen·chəl ′lȯ]
(mathematics)
(physics)
The principle that growth or decay of some physical quantity is at a rate such that its value at a certain time or place is the initial value times e raised to a power equal to a constant times some convenient coordinate, such as the elapsed time or the distance traveled by a wave; there is growth if the constant is positive, decay if it is negative.
References in periodicals archive ?
Exponential law as a more compatible model to describe orbits of planetary systems.
For the exponential law, the damage directly appears when the interface is loaded.
The results in table(1) which pertains to b=1 (belongs to exponential law and represents constant failure rate [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (t)) agrees with the results already discussed as a particular case of the modal with exponential law.
the data transmission is considered to the exponential law [[mu].
It is experimentally established that chemical reactions usually pass according to exponential law (7).
9 showing similarities existing between the processes described above and the exponential law.
Specific topics include the methodological principles of chemical kinetics, the method of routes and kinetic models, problems of stationary kinetics of polymerization up to the high conversion rate, non-stationary (post-polymerization) kinetics and kinetic problems, stationary kinetics of three-dimensional polymerization up to the high conversion rate, the kinetic model and the stretched exponential law, and the statistics of self-avoiding random walks and the stretched exponential law.
According to the exponential law, the world's complexity should continue to increase at an increasing rate.
The relaxation of the shear stress after the cessation of shear was very rapid, approximately according to an exponential law characterized by a relaxation time.
The durations of the time-fields are automatically computed with the exponential law (see section 1.