export

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export

a. goods (visible exports) or services (invisible exports) sold to a foreign country or countries
b. (as modifier): an export licence

export

To save a copy of the current open document, database, image or video into a file format required by a different application. Applications may export to a variety of popular formats. The Save As command in a program gives you access to the export filters in a program. Contrast with import. See foreign format, graphics formats, data conversion and Save As.
References in periodicals archive ?
commissioning and production processes - because only through exportability
For example, the exportability of valuable timber from tropical rain forests has raised critical issues of trade, economic development, and the environment, particularly in the Amazon Basin.
ERP modularity and broad exportability, at operating system level as well as at the levels of the database management system or network, enable businesses to upgrade their information systems more easily.
Also, market competition measured by exportability plays a crucial role in the performance of firms.
Such a strident reorientation of the allegorical frame gives us cause to speculate on current conditions for the global exportability of cinematic text, and, more broadly, on the dilemmas that arise when monolingualism and multilingualism collide on the free market.
These changes, delivered in Spanish, immediately boosted exportability of what became known as telenovelas throughout Latin America and reduced dependence on US programming.
The United States has long prided itself on the exportability of its judicial practices and insights (12) but this "supply side" legal globalization has not been matched by "demand side" performance, and in recent years the "foreign law" issue has become very controversial.
Thanks to Professor Juan Linz's foundational and provocative work, (3) the exportability of the presidential system has been the subject of debate, conversation, and empirical research by probably hundreds of political scientists.
Efficient state-led, market-driven intervention has been the hallmark of Singapore's success story but the exportability of state credibility, systemic efficiencies and local advantages into alien contexts is a matter of academic and political controversy.
At first blush, the exportability of water means we've slipped the final constraint on growth.