expression mark

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expression mark

Music one of a set of musical directions, usually in Italian, indicating how a piece or passage is to be performed
References in periodicals archive ?
The very popular Mandoline appears in four different versions in this volume--the earliest (Vasnier) version, the final version of 1890, and two versions shown in appendices, one of which, in appendix C, shows a considerably different style of piano accompaniment with essentially the same vocal melody, and almost no expression marks at all--this was clearly an experimental attempt.
Except for a very few cases, editorial emendations concern mainly expression marks, slurs, and accidentals; those not included in the critical notes are shown in brackets, although there are entire movements without any of them, or with just a couple.
Thus, although some of Brunetti's inaccuracies were already corrected in the French sets of parts, the occasional lack of expression marks, slurs, or accidentals calls for some editorial intervention.
The inherent expressive quality of each composition is enhanced by an edition that is easy to read and contains excellent fingering and expression marks by the composer.
At the heart of this excellent chapter is a ten-page section, "Expression Marks," a reworking of an earlier essay, "Schubert the Singer" (Music Review 49, no.
In the chapter on "Musicians" in the book's second part, Schroeder discusses how singers and pianists in the age of recording "respond to these expression marks" (p.
It is interesting to compare the profusion of expression marks in Printemps, deriving from the authority of Debussy's mature supervision, with the sparseness of markings in the works which he chose not to publish.
It has the usual features one now expects in music notation software: input via MIDI, mouse, or computer keyboard; MIDI file import and export; WYSIWYG editing with the mouse or keyboard; sophisticated MIDI playback with the interpretation of most expression marks; engraver-quality fonts and printing; and the ability to handle almost any music notation, from Gregorian chant to John Cage, including Philip de Vitry, Duke Ellington, and Elton John.
Some editorial expression marks have been removed, and the interpretation of a few ambiguous accidentals has changed, but the only substantial alteration comes in the Chorale Fantasia, which is forty-nine measures longer in the new version.
Expression marks abound for both the singer and pianist.